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The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem
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The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem

The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem

Jerusalem travel guide

1000 BC – Purchasing Mount Moria

King David conquered Jerusalem, which was a Jebusite city located on the Ophel hill, southeast of today’s Old City area. He bought a neighboring hill, which was later identified with Mount Moria (the site of Isaac’s sacrifice), on which he placed the Ark of the Covenant.
950 BC – The Construction of the First Temple
King Solomon, the son of David, built the First Temple on Mount Moria, which known today as the Temple Mount.

586 BC – The Destruction of the First Temple
Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, conquered Jerusalem, burnt the Temple and exiled the Jews to Babylon.
515 BC – The Construction of the Second Temple

In 537 BC, after 50 years in the Babylonian exile, the Jews were allowed to return to Jerusalem and began to rebuild the city and the Temple. The Second Temple was completed in 515 BC.
Model of Second Temple

37- 4 BC – Herod’s Temple Herod the Great was appointed to the King of Judah and begun to reconstruct the Second Temple and to build the Temple Mount. He built an incredibly magnificent temple and a retaining wall around the Temple Mount enclosure.
70 AD – The Destruction of the Second Temple

The Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans led to the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Temple by Titus. The only remnant left was the western part of the Temple Mount’s retaining wall, which became the focal point of the Jewish people throughout the centuries. The authentic bricks of that wall can be seen at the bottom rows of today’s Western Wall.
May 14, 1948 – The Western Wall Falls to Jordanian Hands

A few hours after the official proclamation of the state of Israel, the Arab armies of the neighboring countries invaded Israel, and the terrible War of Independence begun. The Old City of Jerusalem, with the Western Wall in its center, fell to Jordanian legionnaires.
Western Wall – Virtual Tour

June 7, 1967 – Israel Regains Control of the Western Wall
During the Six Days War and after 19 years, in which the access to the Wall was prevented from the Jews, the Israeli army recaptured the Old City of Jerusalem, and liberated the Western Wall.
The Year 2000 – E-Communication with the Western Wall

Maintaining the old tradition of placing a note with a prayer to God in the Wall’s bricks, the era of High Technology and e-communication provides a virtual answer for those who like to send their prayers to God, without actually visiting the Wall. The believer can now send his request via e-mail or fax and it will be placed between the Wall’s bricks.

Via Dolorosa

Via Dolorosa

The Via Dolorosa, or the Way of Sorrows, is believed to be the route that Jesus took on his way to his crucifixion. This route marks the 14 stations in the Way of the Cross, from the first station where Jesus was condemned to death by Pilate, to the last station where he was laid in the Holy Sepulchre. These stations follow the order of events that is mentioned in the gospels. The last five stations are located inside the church itself and signalize the stations of Jesus' crucifixion and burial. The first eight stations are marked along the street, which goes up from the Muslim Quarter, near the Lions Gate, to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre at the Christian Quarter. Information: Visitors can join the official prayer procession every Friday afternoon, which goes along the Via Dolorosa, from the first station and up to the Holy Sepulchre. The Christian Information Center, located at the Old City, can provide further information regarding Christian sites, Tel: 972-2-6272692. View on google map >>

The Museum for Islamic Art, Jerusalem

The Museum for Islamic Art, Jerusalem

The Museum for Islamic Art in Jerusalem: A Window into the Rich Cultural Heritage of the Middle East Jerusalem is a city that has been at the crossroads of many civilizations throughout history. As a result, the city boasts a rich cultural heritage that has been preserved in its museums and historical sites. The Museum for Islamic Art is one such cultural institution that offers visitors a unique window into the artistic and cultural traditions of the Middle East. The Museum for Islamic Art, located in the heart of Jerusalem, is home to a vast collection of Islamic art and artifacts that date back to the 7th century. The collection includes ceramics, textiles, metalwork, and jewelry, among other things. The museum was founded in 1974 by Vera Bryce Salomons, a Dutch philanthropist, and art collector, who was inspired by her travels through the Middle East. The museum building, designed by the architect Alfred Mansfeld, is a work of art in itself. The structure, which was completed in 1974, is a modernist masterpiece that features a unique blend of geometric and organic forms. The building is surrounded by a lush garden that serves as a peaceful oasis in the midst of the bustling city. The museum's permanent collection is organized thematically, with each section highlighting a different aspect of Islamic art and culture. One of the most impressive sections of the collection is the ceramics gallery, which features a stunning array of earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain from across the Islamic world. The collection includes examples of some of the most intricate and beautiful ceramic work ever created, including Persian lusterware, Iznik pottery, and Chinese-inspired blue and white ceramics. Another highlight of the museum's collection is the textiles gallery, which features a wide range of textiles from across the Islamic world. The collection includes silk and cotton fabrics, embroidered garments, and carpets and rugs. The textiles on display showcase the incredible craftsmanship and artistry that went into creating these beautiful objects. The museum's collection of metalwork is also a must-see for visitors. The collection includes a stunning array of decorative objects made of brass, copper, silver, and gold. The metalwork on display includes everything from ornate candlesticks and candelabras to intricately designed jewelry and weaponry. In addition to its permanent collection, the Museum for Islamic Art also hosts a number of temporary exhibitions throughout the year. These exhibitions feature works of art from across the Islamic world and provide visitors with a deeper understanding of the rich cultural heritage of the region. One of the unique features of the Museum for Islamic Art is its focus on education and outreach. The museum offers a variety of programs and workshops for visitors of all ages, including lectures, guided tours, and hands-on workshops. These programs provide visitors with a deeper understanding of Islamic art and culture and allow them to engage with the museum's collection in a meaningful way. In conclusion, the Museum for Islamic Art in Jerusalem is a must-visit destination for anyone interested in the rich cultural heritage of the Middle East. With its impressive collection of Islamic art and artifacts, stunning architecture, and commitment to education and outreach, the museum offers visitors a unique and enriching cultural experience. Whether you're a seasoned art lover or simply looking to learn more about the history and culture of the region, the Museum for Islamic Art is a destination that should not be missed. Address: 2 Hapalmach St, Jerusalem

The Citadel Jerusalem

The Citadel Jerusalem

The Citadel, one of Jerusalem's most famous sites and what used to be Herod's palace back in the 1st century, the Citadel, situated next to Jaffa Gate, comprises a marvelous restoration area with the Tower of David in its center, The Citadel is a home for the renowned Tower of David Museum, an impressive complex of several halls, which present the history of the city throughout the ages. In the citadel compound are archeological findings attesting to Jerusalem’s long and eventful history: remains of a quarry from the First Temple period; a segment of the wall surrounding Hasmonean Jerusalem; remains of monumental steps ; remains of a fortress that stood in this location during the rule of the Ummayid dynasty (7th and 8th centuries CE) and more. In fact, the citadel compound includes archeological findings from most of the periods in the city’s history. Virtual tours of the The Citadel Jerusalem >> Information: Museum Opening Hours September - June: Sunday to Thursday 10:00-16:00 Friday: closed (open for group visits - advance coordination required) Saturday, holiday eves, holidays 10:00-14:00 July - August: Sunday to Thursday, Saturday: 10:00-17:00 Friday: 10:00-14:00 Guided tours of the permanent exhibition – for individuals Hebrew: Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:30 (in July and August also on Fridays at 10:30) English: Sundays to Thursdays at 11:00 (in July and August also on Fridays at 11:00) French: Tuesdays at 11:00 Tours are included in admission fee. Tours are not available on holidays and holiday eves. To get to the Citadel take bus No 6, 20, or 27 from the Central Bus Station in Jerusalem to Jaffa Gate.

Jerusalem - one of a kind
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