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Jerusalem

inisrael.com travel guide
La Regence Restaurant at the King David Hotel

La Regence Restaurant at the King David Hotel

About La Regence - at the King David hotel Jerusalem At Le Regence Restaurant, the finest ingredients, innovative cooking methods, and precision execution based on classical cooking combine to create a contemporary, fine, surprising, and kosher Israeli cuisine. The kitchen is both avant-garde and simple; rooted in his country, but addressing an international audience at the same time. Using flavors, textures, temperatures, colors, shapes, and aromas, the dishes create an exciting sensation that pleases all senses. We are looking forward to welcoming you to Le Regence and giving you a special, pleasant, and exciting experience. It was a fun and unforgettable culinary experience. Our kitchen In Le Regence Restaurant, Israeli cuisine is refined and contemporary. At the same time avant-garde and simple, it addresses an international audience while being rooted in its country. A sensory experience involving flavors, textures, temperatures, colors, shapes, and aromas stimulates all five senses at once. Please let us know when you are available so we can give you a special, pleasant and exciting experience at Le Regence. Culinary experience that is fun and unforgettable. Local, seasonal, and fresh products are at the forefront of the chef's menu. The foundation of a beautifully executed virtuoso work of art is the artist's passion, imagination and creativity, as well as his endless curiosity and constant search for knowledge. Le Regence Restaurant invites you into a magical and enchanting world. Address: King David St 23, Jerusalem Phone: 02-620-8888

Chakra restaurant Jerusalem – Mediterranean fusion style

Chakra restaurant Jerusalem – Mediterranean fusion style

Non-kosher restaurant bar with a good vibe, beautiful people, and good food, accurate execution, and the service is friendly. Among the classic dishes offered on the Mediterranean menu are, jumbo shrimp, cheeseburgers, and more. Chakra Restaurant has been operating in Jerusalem since 2000 and is an anchor for the city's food and nightlife culture. Located near the Independence Garden in the heart of Jerusalem, this restaurant offers a meticulous service, modern cuisine, a lively and diverse bar, and a pastoral atmosphere. With a daily changing menu of fresh goods, there is a rich and varied menu in a Mediterranean fusion style that includes fish dishes, seafood, meats, and a special menu. Chakra restaurant guests can enjoy the fresh and warm air in the garden square in the summer evenings, as well as the view of the city garden. Address: 41 King George Street, Jerusalem Phone: 02-625-2733

A new Isrotel hotel in Jerusalem will open in 2024

A new Isrotel hotel in Jerusalem will open in 2024

A new Isrotel hotel in Jerusalem will open in 2024 at Zion Square, Jerusalem and will offer 250 rooms! The new hotel that the Isrotel chain is building in Zion Square in Jerusalem will be built on the basis of two buildings for preservation, on which an addition of four new floors will be built. The buildings will be connected by an overhead bridge, the first of its kind in the city. The bridge, which has a glass floor, will be used as a dining area and lobby and will allow a panoramic view towards Zion Square, the pedestrian street and Jaffa Street. The hotel is in the urban center of Jerusalem, close to the light rail and the centers of history, culture and lively entertainment. The hotel has a swimming pool on the roof, a conference hall and meeting rooms, restaurants and an adjacent parking lot. There is no doubt that there is something new in Jerusalem, the city is getting a boost in the field of transportation with a fast train from Tel Aviv and many infrastructures that have been improved and also new hotels that will open soon. There is something to look forward to.

ALMOND hotel Jerusalem – opening in 2023!

ALMOND hotel Jerusalem – opening in 2023!

The Almond Hotel, a new premium hotel in the Jerusalem area, is set to open soon. The new hotel will offer a luxurious and pampering vacation for couples only. The new hotel will offer 60 particularly spacious rooms, including 20 rooms with private pools, a lounge floor, a luxurious spa complex with 8 treatment rooms and a variety of facilities. On the roof of the hotel is a unique pool that overlooks the magical view of the coastal plain and the Judean Mountains. Full details soon.

Israel Aquarium, Jerusalem

Israel Aquarium, Jerusalem

Israel Aquarium, Jerusalem, is the first aquarium in Israel built by the Gottsman family. The aquarium focuses on the conservation of habitats and marine environments in Israel, a contemporary challenge in nature conservation. Visiting the aquarium will take you on a fascinating tour that highlights the marine habitats in Israel, including the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, the Sea of Galilee, and even the Dead Sea. During your visit to the aquarium, you will be taken on a fascinating journey between the different marine habitats in Israel, in the Mediterranean Sea. The complex contains a variety of creatures ranging from shallow shore habitats to deep sea habitats. At the Red Sea displays you will get to know the colorful fish and corals that are unique to the sea. The one-way route will lead you between the magical worlds of the sea and the creatures that inhabit it. The aquarium was established in accordance with the recommendations of the National Program for the Conservation of Biodiversity in Israel. These recommendations emphasize the urgent and immediate need to preserve the marine environment in Israel. The habitats, fish, corals and other sea creatures are subject to many ecological threats - the pollution of the sea and its shores, overfishing and constant pressure from various factors such as tourism, trade, desalination, gas and oil drilling. Due to all of these, the urgent need arose to build a center that would deal with conservation, research, education, information and raising public awareness for the preservation of the sea and its shores. This is the "Israel Aquarium, Jerusalem" Address: Derech Aharon Shulov, Jerusalem

kiftzuba, an amusement and experience park near Jerusalem

kiftzuba, an amusement and experience park near Jerusalem

kiftzuba Park, an amusement and experience park, covers 120 Acres and is located in front of the amazing and breathtaking view of the Jerusalem mountains. kiftzuba is an attractive park - suitable for family fun - and is intended for ages one to 14. The park, some of whose facilities are indoor and some in the open air, offers a fun experience for the whole family with a variety of activities suitable for a wide range of ages, from crawling babies to teenagers and adults - so families in the lineup Full of possibilities to reach a whole day consisting of various attractions suitable for everyone. So what does the place offer you? A family roller coaster, a boat in a storm, a pirate carousel, giant inflatables, colliding cars, a ball pool, tricycles and many other attractions. The park offers you to celebrate your children's birthday in style and order one of the birthday packages that the place offers. As part of kiftzuba's birthday packages, your child and all his friends will be able to enjoy free use of the complex's facilities, a special shirt for a special child on his birthday, a crown for his head, a colorful tablecloth, a happy and colorful "Congratulations" sign and everything you need to celebrate a real and fun birthday at kiftzuba's amusement park . We invest both a lot of thought and enormous resources in order to make your experience in the park complete and perfect, and one that will suit any age. We recently invested and we are constantly investing in new and attractive facilities from around the world, and even attend the most prestigious exhibitions in the field in order to continue to innovate and improve. In addition, we have engraved the issue of safety on our banner and we do everything to provide you and your children with a fun and safe experience. We maintain the facilities on a daily basis, as well as perform many and uncompromising quality control tests.

The Jerusalem Science Museum

The Jerusalem Science Museum

The Bloomfield Science Museum is the place for learning about science with interactive displays that invite children and parents to touch, experience, and enjoy science. The museum offers guided tours, construction workshops, and special events with new exhibits, guest exhibitions, workshops, demonstrations, activities, and live shows. On Fridays and Saturdays, the entrance to the museum is free of charge. The history of the Science Museum In 1980, a group of scholars from the Hebrew University came together with the goal of establishing a permanent space for exhibiting science in ways that will enthrall and attract everyone: adults, teenagers and even very young children. The group sought to model the new museum on the Exploratorium in San Francisco, which was founded by Frank Oppenheimer in 1969. Together with Canada’s Ontario Science Centre, which opened in the same year, these institutions presented the world with an innovative model for interactive science museums. The group led by Professor Hillman established a non-profit called “Simply Science” for the purpose and set to work. “Simply Science” operated from the Givat Ram campus for ten years. The science museum is working on a project to build a museum of nature in Israel as part of a shared campus. This campus will show how different scientific disciplines are connected, as well as how they can be used to understand the world around us. Museum Hours Sunday closed Monday–Thursday 10:00-18:00 Friday 10:00-14:00 Saturday 10:00-16:00

The Museum for Islamic Art, Jerusalem

The Museum for Islamic Art, Jerusalem

The Museum for Islamic Art in Jerusalem is a museum that tells the story of the Islamic world from the 7th century to the 19th century. The museum has a lot of different types of objects from that time period, including metalwork, jewelry, musical instruments, and more. One of the displays at the museum is a collection of old European watches and clocks. The collection has many different types of watches and clocks, including some that are musical or have singing birds. Some of the pieces in the collection are very rare and valuable. Address: 2 Hapalmach St, Jerusalem

The Herzl Center

The Herzl Center

The Herzl Center for Zionist Studies is a place where people can learn about Theodor Herzl, the man who created the Zionist ideology. The Center has programs that last from a few hours to a few days, and they are for people of all denominations who want to learn more about Zionism. The Center also has goals to create a bridge between the past and the present, and to pass Herzl's legacy on to the younger generation. Herzl was a Zionist thinker who believed that the Jewish people deserved their own land. 100 years later, his thoughts on Jewish identity, Anti-Semitism, and the relationship between Diaspora Jewry and Zionism are still relevant. Herzl's final wish was to be buried in the "Land of Israel" which shows his belief in the future of the Jewish people. Museum Address: Mount Herzl - Herzl boulevard, Jerusalem Phone: +(972)2-6321515 Hours: Sun - Thur 08:30 AM - 18:00 PM (Last Entry 17:00 PM) Friday 08:30 AM - 13:30 PM (Last Entry 11:30 AM) Reservation Desk Sun - Thur 08:30 AM - 16:30 PM Friday 08:30 AM - 12:15 PM Entry by Reservation Only

On the Seam – a unique boutique museum

On the Seam – a unique boutique museum

On the Seam is a unique boutique museum which exhibits the finest art from Israel and abroad by leading contemporary artists, and discusses social, gender-oriented, ethnic and geographical issues, while emphasizing what connects us rather than what keeps us apart. Past exhibitions at the Museum, which was described by the National Geographic as “a fascinating and unique museum”, have dealt with themes of human rights, animal rights, ecology and sustainability, and the place of the individual, among others, in modern world. The Museum, which was selected by the CNN as “one of Israel’s 10 best museums”, is located in a beautiful neo-classical building, built in 1932. During the years Jerusalem was divided (1948-1967), the house was turned into an Israeli military outpost situated on the border between Israel and Jordan, and was the only passage between the two parts of the divided city. During the battles of the 1967 war, the house suffered hits from shells and bullets that are apparent to this day. Address: Kheil ha-Handasa St 4, Jerusalem,

The Temple Institute’s Holy Temple Museum

The Temple Institute’s Holy Temple Museum

The Temple Institute's Holy Temple Museum is a museum about the Temple-ready sacred vessels created by the Institute, the garments of the High Priest, oil-paintings depicting aspects of the Divine service of the Holy Temple, and a model of the Holy Temple Complex. The museum also includes a spacious gift shop. Location: 40 Misgav Ladach St., Jewish Quarter (Directly above the Yehudah HaLevi stairs which lead from the Jewish Quarter to the Western Wall Plaza.)

The Hebrew Music Museum in Jerusalem

The Hebrew Music Museum in Jerusalem

The Hebrew Music Museum in Jerusalem is a place where you can learn about the history of Hebrew music and see ancient musical instruments from all over the world. The museum has displays and games that help you learn about the music and the instruments. The Hebrew Music Museum offers a guided tour where you can learn about the different instruments, the people who play them, and the cultures they come from. You can also choose to tour the museum independently with a tablet and headphones. There are interactive activities for all ages, including a VR performance of the music of Levitas in the Temple, electronic drumming on Ethiopian drums, and playing ethnic musical instruments. Address: 12 Yoel Moshe Salomon Street, Jerusalem, Israel

Jerusalem Layout

Jerusalem Layout

A Celebration of Colors A trip to Jerusalem is an exciting journey into many types of cultures, traditions and neighborhoods. Along the history of the city, people of different religions, from all over the world, have set their homes in Jerusalem, making it an exotic place to discover. Many visitors to Jerusalem are drawn to the city's exceptional ambience and unique aura. The city of Jerusalem consists of three main parts: The most historical holy part is the walled Old City, where the major sites, the lively alleys and the colorful markets are. The Old City itself is divided into four quarters: The Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, the Jewish Quarter and the Muslim Quarter. Outside the walls is the New City, also known as West Jerusalem. Here is where you can enjoy the vibrant modern metropolis of the active bars and cafes, the malls, the impressive museums and galleries, and the expanding Israeli neighborhoods and industrial high-tech zones. The third part of Jerusalem is East Jerusalem, populated mostly with Palestinians, presenting a wide range of oriental restaurants, lively shops and inexpensive hotels.

The Twin Cave – attractions around Jerusalem

The Twin Cave – attractions around Jerusalem

The Twin Cave is an ancient cave intertwined with stories and discoveries from the time of the Maccabees and stories about different types of bats that find their favorite cool and dark place. The route leading to the cave lasts less than an hour in each direction and is not particularly difficult, children aged 4 and over will manage without help most of the time. The tour of the cool and humid cave is especially pleasant after the heat outside and you should enter with personal flashlights if you want to see their way. In the depths of the Twin Caves springs a spring that some believe have healing properties for its waters. Up the road, minutes after the cave opens, you can glide on a natural slide made of very smooth rock. The children will be able to spend long minutes of fun there and so will you. The cave is not open to visitors at a time when the bats are sleeping their winter sleep. The cave is not far from the Stalactite Cave a short distance from Beit Shemesh and Jerusalem.

Mamilla mall, Jerusalem

Mamilla mall, Jerusalem

The first of July has arrived, the day that symbolizes more than anything the opening cheer of the great freedom and it seems that there is no escape and the mall will become the hot arena of events for the coming months of freedom for our good. And if you already have a shopping experience, it is especially recommended to visit the Sderot Mamilla mall, Jerusalem, the city where those who do not live or were born in it always feel a bit like a tourist. The mall is located in front of the Jaffa Gate, part of the prestigious district overlooking the Old City, Jerusalem. Mamilla Mall is an "open mall" built as an avenue that preserves the architectural heritage of the past combined with an addictive and up-to-date shopping experience. The mall has 120 national chains and select stores of local and international brands, boutiques, cafes and restaurants. The mall has an indoor hall where various shows, games and activities for children are held from time to time. Among the large variety of stores: Mango, MAC, Castro, Steimatzky, e. Stern, BEBE, Polo Ralph Lauren, Nautica, Tommy Hilfiger, Top Shop, and many more goodies! Among the international luxury stores that have recently made an ascent to the Holy City, you will find the flagship store of the prestigious ROLEX SHOW brand, instead of a significant selection of other luxury brands such as Gucci, Radu, Lacroix, Omega and many more. The Nike store is designed in a European style that holds unique and exclusive models. The only CROCS brand store in Jerusalem, THE NORTH FACE - one of the world's leading brands in the field of outdoor activities, cycling clothing, ski clothing and various accessories. At the end of the boulevard is the prestigious Mamilla Hotel with a view of the city walls.

The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem

The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem

1000 BC – Purchasing Mount Moria King David conquered Jerusalem, which was a Jebusite city located on the Ophel hill, southeast of today’s Old City area. He bought a neighboring hill, which was later identified with Mount Moria (the site of Isaac’s sacrifice), on which he placed the Ark of the Covenant. 950 BC – The Construction of the First Temple King Solomon, the son of David, built the First Temple on Mount Moria, which known today as the Temple Mount. 586 BC – The Destruction of the First Temple Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, conquered Jerusalem, burnt the Temple and exiled the Jews to Babylon. 515 BC – The Construction of the Second Temple In 537 BC, after 50 years in the Babylonian exile, the Jews were allowed to return to Jerusalem and began to rebuild the city and the Temple. The Second Temple was completed in 515 BC. Model of Second Temple 37- 4 BC – Herod’s Temple Herod the Great was appointed to the King of Judah and begun to reconstruct the Second Temple and to build the Temple Mount. He built an incredibly magnificent temple and a retaining wall around the Temple Mount enclosure. 70 AD – The Destruction of the Second Temple The Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans led to the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Temple by Titus. The only remnant left was the western part of the Temple Mount’s retaining wall, which became the focal point of the Jewish people throughout the centuries. The authentic bricks of that wall can be seen at the bottom rows of today’s Western Wall. May 14, 1948 – The Western Wall Falls to Jordanian Hands A few hours after the official proclamation of the state of Israel, the Arab armies of the neighboring countries invaded Israel, and the terrible War of Independence begun. The Old City of Jerusalem, with the Western Wall in its center, fell to Jordanian legionnaires. Western Wall – Virtual Tour June 7, 1967 – Israel Regains Control of the Western Wall During the Six Days War and after 19 years, in which the access to the Wall was prevented from the Jews, the Israeli army recaptured the Old City of Jerusalem, and liberated the Western Wall. The Year 2000 – E-Communication with the Western Wall Maintaining the old tradition of placing a note with a prayer to God in the Wall’s bricks, the era of High Technology and e-communication provides a virtual answer for those who like to send their prayers to God, without actually visiting the Wall. The believer can now send his request via e-mail or fax and it will be placed between the Wall’s bricks.

Tower of David Museum Jerusalem

Tower of David Museum Jerusalem

Set in the magnificently restored ancient Citadel' first constructed 2,000 years ago by Herod the Great, the Tower of David Museum traces Jerusalem long and eventful history through state-of-the-art displays and exhibits' utilizing the most advanced technologies. Canaanites and Hebrews, Greeks and Romans, Crusaders, Muslims, Turks, British, and Israelis are richly presented and seek harmony within the age-old walls. The panoramic route along the Citadel towers with its most breathtaking views of the city and the lush archaelogical gardens, all add to an experience you will cherish. For the first time, the City of David reveals the story of the revival of ancient Jerusalem in a unique and exciting show screened in the first groundbreaking technology of its kind in Israel, on top of the antiquities of the City of David, under the open sky! More than 2,500 years ago, Jerusalem was destroyed - and the Babylonian exile began. The story of the revival of ancient Jerusalem is told through an advanced technological show projected on the antiquities of the City of David - right where history took place.

The Holy sites of Jerusalem

The Holy sites of Jerusalem

Being the most important city for all major religions, the old city of Jerusalem is probably the most fascinating trip you can make while visiting Israel. The history of Jerusalem combines some of the most important events in Jewish and Christian history alike, and the religious sites spread throughout the city capture the imagination of each and every visitor. The Wailing Wall (the Western Wall) is the first stop for Jewish travelers in the old city of Jerusalem. It is the only remaining part of the ancient temple of King Solomon which has become the holiest spot in Jewish life and an Israeli national symbol as well. The Wailing Wall is where Jewish worshipers pray in a designated area in front of the holy site; mourn over the destruction of the Temple by the Romans, and wish for the return of Israel's former glory. They also write their personal requests from G-d and post it in little notes between the wall's ancient stones. Mount Zion is another Jewish and Christian holy site you wouldn't want to miss. According to Jewish tradition, Mount Zion is the burial place of King David. Today, it is one of the most popular Jewish burial sites in Jerusalem. Mount Zion is very significant for Christians as well: according to Christian belief, it is where the last supper was held, in the building identified as the Coenaculum, which is also where Jesus reappeared after his resurrection. According to Christianity, in this area of the city the disciples and early Christians were living at the time. Beyond its history, Mount Zion offers some spectacular views of the old city of Jerusalem. Jerusalem's vicinity offers several other significant sites for Christian visitors: the nearby Bethlehem, where Jesus was born; the Mount of Olives, where he ascended to heaven, according to Christianity; and the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, which is the first among the Christian shrines in the Old City of Jerusalem, where the resurrection has been celebrated for many centuries as the most sacred place in all of Christendom. Plus there is the Via Dolorosa, the holiest Christian thoroughfare in the world: This path is symbolically reliving the events of the passion, and includes the shrine of the ascension, the Garden of Gethsemane and Mount Zion. The holy sites of the old city of Jerusalem have defined its nature for thousands of years and still reflect its remarkable history and significance. Visiting some of these sites and wondering through the streets and markets of the old city is an experience you will carry with you for many years after visiting one of the most special cities in the entire world.

Mamilla Alrov Mall, Jerusalem

Mamilla Alrov Mall, Jerusalem

The summer vacation is at its peak, and it seems like there's no stopping the mall from becoming the hottest venue for all events during the vacation months. And if you're going to be shopping, you should definitely check out the Mamilla Mall in Jerusalem - a city in which anyone who doesn't live there or wasn't born there feels like a tourist. The mall is situated opposite the Jaffa Gate, close to the Mamilla Jerusalem Hotel and is part of the exclusive area that overlooks the Old City of Jerusalem. The Mamilla Mall is an open-air mall, built as a boulevard that preserves the area's architectural heritage, while integrating it into a modern day shopping experience. There are 120 stores in the mall, both national chains as well as select stores belonging to local and international designers, boutiques, cafes and restaurants. The mall also has a closed auditorium where various performances are held, and where games and entertainment options are available for children. Among the huge variety of stores in the mall are: Mango, MAC, GAP, Castro, Steimatzky, H. Stern, BEBE, Polo Ralph Lauren, Nautica, Tommy Hilfiger, Topshop and many, many more! Among the luxury international stores that recently immigrated to Jerusalem, you'll be able to find Rolex Show, which is Rolex's flagship store. The mall also hosts a number of other luxury brands including Gucci, Rado, Lacroix, Omega and many others. The Nike store has a European design and carries unique and exclusive styles. Other stores in the mall include Crocs, the only one in Jerusalem, and The North Face - one of the leading brands in the world for climbing and backpacking equipment, mountaineering apparel and skiwear. The mall offers its patrons an adjacent, indoor parking lot.

The Jerusalem Bird Observatory – JBO

The Jerusalem Bird Observatory – JBO

The Jerusalem Bird Observatory - JBO, houses the Israel national bird-ringing center and is a part of the Israeli Ornithological Center of the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel (SPNI). The JBO strives to protect urban wildlife sites. All of its Ecological, research, and educational activities are non-profit. The JBO is located in the center of Jerusalem near the Knesset. Visitors can stop by for an eco-experience. Bird watching and presentation about bird migration in Israel is available for tourists visiting as groups or individuals. The JBO provides Israeli students, particularly children living in Jerusalem and other urban areas, with a unique opportunity to experience the environment first-hand. Student activities include "close encounters" with ringed birds, birdwatching tours, a birdwatching club, lectures about bird life, nature conservation, and presentations of current research being conducted at the JBO. Meetings may will include a bird walk followed by a lecture or video presentation on a wide variety of topics relating to birds such as the wonders of migration, how birds fly, raptors of Israel and more and may feature a variety of guest speakers. Some presentations will be in English and are open to all – beginner to experienced. Most meetings will start at the Bird Observatory although a couple will start in other locations. A schedulue will be provided on registration.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Church of the Holy Sepulchre

The holiest Christian shrine in the world is situated on the Hill of Golgotha (skull hill), used to be an execution location outside the city walls. According to Christian gospels, and with compatibility to archeological discoveries, this is the real site of Jesus' crucifixion, burial and resurrection. The beautiful architecture of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is a combination of Crusader, Byzantine and Greek structures. In addition, five Christian communities share the Church today: the Roman Catholic, the Greek Orthodox, the Armenian, the Coptic and the Syrian Orthodox, each has its own part inside the church. The Holy Sepulchre History: In 335 AD, Constantin, the Emperor of Byzantium, and his mother, Helena, built a splendid church on the exact site where the massive excavations they ran revealed the tomb of Jesus. The church was completely destroyed by Caliph El-Hakim in 1009, partly reconstructed by the Byzantines in 1042, and entirely rebuilt by the Crusaders when they entered Jerusalem on July 15, 1099. However, a big fire in 1808 caused a lot of damaged to the church, which had been repaired by the Greek Orthodox during the last century. The architecture of the church as it exists today is therefore a combination of Crusader, Byzantine and Greek structures. Information: Visitors of all religions are requested to enter the Church of the Holy Sepulchre modestly dressed. The church is open daily from 5:00am to 9:00pm (4:00am to 8:00pm at wintertime), admission is free. The church can be reached from Jaffa Gate, through the Christian Quarter St., or from the Lions Gate following Jesus' footsteps along the Via Doloroza. Virtual Tours of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher

Via Dolorosa

Via Dolorosa

The Via Dolorosa, or the Way of Sorrows, is believed to be the route that Jesus took on his way to his crucifixion. This route marks the 14 stations in the Way of the Cross, from the first station where Jesus was condemned to death by Pilate, to the last station where he was laid in the Holy Sepulchre. These stations follow the order of events that is mentioned in the gospels. The last five stations are located inside the church itself and signalize the stations of Jesus' crucifixion and burial. The first eight stations are marked along the street, which goes up from the Muslim Quarter, near the Lions Gate, to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre at the Christian Quarter. Information: Visitors can join the official prayer procession every Friday afternoon, which goes along the Via Dolorosa, from the first station and up to the Holy Sepulchre. The Christian Information Center, located at the Old City, can provide further information regarding Christian sites, Tel: 972-2-6272692. View on google map >>

The Citadel Jerusalem

The Citadel Jerusalem

The Citadel, one of Jerusalem's most famous sites and what used to be Herod's palace back in the 1st century, the Citadel, situated next to Jaffa Gate, comprises a marvelous restoration area with the Tower of David in its center, The Citadel is a home for the renowned Tower of David Museum, an impressive complex of several halls, which present the history of the city throughout the ages. In the citadel compound are archeological findings attesting to Jerusalem’s long and eventful history: remains of a quarry from the First Temple period; a segment of the wall surrounding Hasmonean Jerusalem; remains of monumental steps ; remains of a fortress that stood in this location during the rule of the Ummayid dynasty (7th and 8th centuries CE) and more. In fact, the citadel compound includes archeological findings from most of the periods in the city’s history. Virtual tours of the The Citadel Jerusalem >> Information: Museum Opening Hours September - June: Sunday to Thursday 10:00-16:00 Friday: closed (open for group visits - advance coordination required) Saturday, holiday eves, holidays 10:00-14:00 July - August: Sunday to Thursday, Saturday: 10:00-17:00 Friday: 10:00-14:00 Guided tours of the permanent exhibition – for individuals Hebrew: Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:30 (in July and August also on Fridays at 10:30) English: Sundays to Thursdays at 11:00 (in July and August also on Fridays at 11:00) French: Tuesdays at 11:00 Tours are included in admission fee. Tours are not available on holidays and holiday eves. To get to the Citadel take bus No 6, 20, or 27 from the Central Bus Station in Jerusalem to Jaffa Gate.

The Temple Mount Jerusalem

The Temple Mount Jerusalem

Holy to both Muslims and Jews, the Temple Mount (or Haram ash-Sharif in Arabic) is the most remarkable well-known symbol of Jerusalem, and the most controversial either. For Jews it is the ancient Mount Moriah, where Abraham almost sacrificed his son Isaac, and where the First and Second Temples were built. For Muslims it is their third holiest shrine, as said to be the site from where Muhammad have ascended to heaven on his Night Journey. Visible from almost anywhere around the Old City, the Temple Mount is a wide area with the Dome of the Rock in its center and the El-Aqsa Mosque at its southern edge. The Dome of the Rock: Glowing with its magnificent golden dome, and holding the sacred rock upon Isaac was almost sacrificed and from which Muhammad rose to heaven, the Dome of the Rock was built by Caliph Abd el-Malik in 691 AD, as part of the Muslims attempt to demonstrate their ascendance over Christianity. Traditionally known as the center of the world, the sacred rock inside shows the legendary mark of Muhammad's footprint. El-Aqsa Mosque: Built by the son of Abd el-Malik, Caliph Walid, in the early 8th century, the El-Aqsa Mosque, with its silver-black dome, is far less glorious than the Dome of the Rock, but it serves as the actual place of worship for Muslim pilgrimages coming to the Temple Mount. Its name means "the farthest", referring to the farthest point that was reached by Muhammad on his Night Journey. Information: Entering the Temple Mount is through a gate called Mughrabi Gate, reached from the Western Wall area. Visitors should remember to be appropriately dressed (i.e. with no bare body parts), and to be prepared to sometimes a long queue at the security checking point. Visiting hours are Saturday to Thursday from 7:30am to 11:00am, and from 1:30pm to 2:30pm. The site is closed on Friday. (Notice that these times can be changed as they are based on Muslim prayer times).

The Old City of Jerusalem

The Old City of Jerusalem

The Holiest City on Earth, surrounded by glorious walls, the Old City of Jerusalem (Yerushalayim in Hebrew, El-Quds in Arabic) is the highlight of the city, and the actual place where the mythologies of Judaism, Christianity and Islam occurred. Within its lively narrow alleys and colorful markets lie the major historical and religious sites of the world's three main religions, revealing the ancient history from the times of King David, Jesus Christ and Prophet Muhammad. It is the Dome of the Rock at the Temple Mount, the third holiest Muslim site, from where Muhammad is said to have ascended to heaven on his Night Journey. The same spot, known as Mount Moriah, is where God tested Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his son Isaac, and on which King Solomon chose to build the First Temple. This is where the Western Wall, last remains of the Second Temple and most sacred Jewish site in the world, stands today. Not far from there lies the holiest Christian site, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, held to be the location of Jesus' crucifixion, burial and resurrection. Israel from Joe Robinson on Vimeo. The Old City is divided into four quarters - the Jewish Quarter, the Christian Quarter, the Muslim Quarter and the Armenian Quarter - each one comprises its own special shrines. Walking around the streets of the Old City you will not see any distinct separation between the four parts, but you might notice the cultural and architectural differences between them.

Jerusalem’s Culture, People and neighborhoods

Jerusalem’s Culture, People and neighborhoods

A city which is a celebration of colors, sites and people, a trip to Jerusalem is an exciting journey into many types of cultures, traditions and neighborhoods. Along the history of the city, people of different religions, from all over the world, have set their homes in Jerusalem, making it an exotic place to discover. Many visitors to Jerusalem are drawn to the city's exceptional ambiance and unique aura. The city of Jerusalem consists of three main parts: A View to the Old City The most historical holy part is the walled Old City, where the major sites, the lively alleys and the colorful markets are. The Old City itself is divided into four quarters: The Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, the Jewish Quarter and the Muslim Quarter. A View to the New City Outside the walls is the New City, also known as West Jerusalem. Here is where you can enjoy the vibrant modern metropolis of the active bars and cafes, the malls, the impressive museums and galleries, and the expanding Israeli neighborhoods and industrial high-tech zones. A View to East Jerusalem The third part of Jerusalem is East Jerusalem, populated mostly with Palestinians, presenting a wide range of oriental restaurants, lively shops and inexpensive hotels.

Jerusalem’s History

Jerusalem’s History

Jerusalem's history stretches back about 5,000 years. About 2500 BC, the Canaanites inhabited the city. Later, Jerusalem became a Jebusite citadel. When DAVID captured the city (c.1000 BC), the Jebusites were absorbed into the Jewish people. David made Jerusalem the capital of his kingdom, and SOLOMON built the first Temple to house the Ark of the Covenant. In 586 BC, the Babylonian NEBUCHADNEZZAR II destroyed Jerusalem and the Temple and exiled the Jews to Babylonia. Fifty years later (537 BC), CYRUS THE GREAT of Persia conquered Babylonia and permitted the Jews to return to Jerusalem and rebuild their Temple. Persia held the city until 333 BC, when ALEXANDER THE GREAT added Palestine to his empire. In 323 BC, PTOLEMY I of Egypt took Palestine into his kingdom. About 198 BC, the Seleucid king ANTIOCHUS III conquered Judaea (of which Jerusalem was a part), making it tributary to Syria. The Jews later revolted under the leadership of Maccabees and defeated the Syrians. The Temple was reconsecrated in 165 BC, and the Maccabean, or Hasmonean, dynasty ruled until Rome took the city in 63 BC. The Romans set up a local dynasty, the house of Herod, to rule most of Palestine; Herod the Great (r. 40-4 BC) rebuilt much of Jerusalem, including the Temple. Roman governors, however, retained ultimate control; one of them, Pontius Pilate, authorized the execution of Jesus Christ. While suppressing a major Jewish revolt, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple in AD 70. In 135, after the failure of the BAR KOCHBA revolt, Jews were banished from Jerusalem. From the early 4th century, when Christianity became legal in the Roman Empire, Jerusalem developed as a center of Christian pilgrimage. The Church of the Holy Sepulcher and many other Christian shrines were erected. Except for a brief period of Persian rule (614-28) the city remained under Roman (later, Byzantine) control until 638, when the Muslim Arabs took Jerusalem. The Arabs built (688-91) the Dome of the Rock mosque on the site of the Temple. In the 11th century, Muslim toleration of both Jews and Christians gave way to persecution under the FATIMID caliph al-Hakim (r. 996-1021) and under the SELJUKS, who seized Jerusalem in 1071. European Christendom responded by launching the CRUSADES. The Crusaders conquered Jerusalem in 1099 and established a Crusader state. SALADIN recaptured the city for the Muslims in 1187, and the Ayyubid and Mameluke dynasties ruled until 1517, when the Ottoman Empire took control. In 1917 the British occupied Jerusalem, and it became the capital of mandated PALESTINE from 1923 until 1948. During this period the city saw Arab rioting against the Jews. The 1948 United Nations partition plan for Palestine called for internationalization of the city. The Arabs rejected this resolution, and, from 1949, Jerusalem was divided into an Israeli and a Jordanian sector. The city remained divided until 1967, when Israel took the entire city following the Six Day War. The city is reunited today under Israeli government, which guarantees religious freedom and protection of all holy places.

The Armenian Quarter – Jerusalem Old City

The Armenian Quarter – Jerusalem Old City

Situated to the right of the vibrant Christian Quarter is the secret Armenian Quarter, the most isolate of all of the quarters in the old city. The quarter goes back to the time when Armenian Christianity began and has a long history of Armenian pilgrims setting foot at its gate. The discovery of holy sites for Christians in the city caused many of the pilgrims to become fixed residents in the Armenian Quarter. Dating back to the turn of the fourth century, when Armenia was declared as the first Christian state in the world, the Armenian Quarter developed into one of the main substances in the Christian entity of Jerusalem. Due to wars and peregrination the Armenian populace in the old city has shrunk these days to a little under 1000. Still, this tight community lives its life in the surroundings of St. James Church, which envelopes the Armenian faith in Jerusalem and is also the residual place of the Armenian patriarchate. Unfortunately, the Armenian Quarter is far from living up to its full tourism potential. With the church and its surrounding areas closed to the public, in the quarter you can visit teh museum of the Armenian history and artwork, which is quite interesting but not easily found.

Wohl Archaeological Museum  Jerusalem

Wohl Archaeological Museum Jerusalem

The Wohl Archaeological Museum is located in the Herodian Quarter, which was considered the upscale, wealthy neighborhood in the city during the time of the Second Temple. The site was discovered during archaeological digs conducted in the Jewish Quarter between 1969-1983 and is considered the largest covered archaeological site in Israel. Six houses belonging to the Jerusalem elite were discovered there, most likely belonging to the ruling family during the Herodian Era (some 2,000 years ago). The findings - wells, mikvehs (ritual baths), mosaic-tiled floors and fresco - bear testament to the owners' wealth. Numerous rock tools and utensils were also found at the site. Address: 1 HaKaraim St., Jerusalem Jewish Quarter of the Old City Phone: 972-2-626-5906

Christian Quarter – Old City Jerusalem

Christian Quarter – Old City Jerusalem

The Christian Quarter functions as the most toured quarter of the old city and the second largest out of the four. Located only moments after the Jaffa gate in the northwest, it serves many of the people visiting the old city, as its threshold. The quarter, consisting of both broad streets and narrow alleys, is the base for the famous Holy Sepulchre Church. The church is said to be built over the areas of Jesus’ crucifixion, burial place and his resurrection. Serving as the heart of Christian life in Jerusalem, the quarter naturally plays the part of home for monks, nuns and priests as well as being connected to both the Greek and Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem. Besides the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the quarter prides itself in the Mursitan, built over the wreckage of the old Knights Hospitaller hospital, which serves now as a marketplace. Also, tourists can find themselves entering the neo-Romanesque Lutheran Church of the Redeemer or continuing their shopping in the Christian Quarter Shuk which leads into the bazaar of the Moslem Quarter, where they can find many souvenir shops with the same variety on the whole. More about the Old CIty >>

Baka Neighbourhood Jerusalem

Baka Neighbourhood Jerusalem

Baka is another one of the neighborhoods in Jerusalem, infected by the American Jewish invasions to Jerusalem. Enough so that if this invasion continues it seems as if soon enough the whole area of the German Colony, Baka and Katamon will become a sort of satellite neighborhood of Brooklyn. Known once for its prosperous times in the British Mandatory, when it was mostly populated by Arab Christians, today, the apartments that were resettled during 1948, serve mainly new immigrants coming from the states and France. Baka’s main street, Beit Lechem, isn’t as sophisticated as its supposed twin from the German Colony, Emek Refaim. But, acting as a melting pot for new immigrants, with the famous Ulpan Etzion (the biggest Hebrew language school for new immigrants in Jerusalem) nestled in it, you can be sure to find great European and American food in the area, proving that the absorption process is going well.

Jewish Quarter – Old City Jerusalem

Jewish Quarter – Old City Jerusalem

Dating back to the days of the Turkish reign over Israel, the old city has been parted into four sections, each representing its habitants; The Jewish quarter, the Armenian quarter, the Christian quarter and the Muslim quarter. Although the Jewish Quarter is considered to be the oldest quarter in the city, dating back to the days of the bible, in terms of the architecture found in the quarter, it is considered to be the newest quarter of the four. Besides being the second smallest section in the city, most of the houses that can be found in the quarter, date back to only the 1960’s and 1970’s. During the war of independence, the quarter, that knew prosperous times during the Turkish regime, was attacked fiercely by the Jordanian forces. With only several young Palmach defenders and without any food or water, the quarter quickly found itself cut off from the rest of Jerusalem and Israel, in foreign hands. The Jordanian troops wiped out most of the Jewish houses leaving only one synagogue standing and causing the Jews of the quarter to seek refuge outside the walls of the old city. After the six day war in 1967, the archeologists seized the opportunity the recapturing of the city brought and went out on a big excavation following Jerusalem’s ancient history. The digs resulted in the exposure of the Cardo (the old market street in the Roman-Byzanite period), the Burnt House, Robinson’s Bow and many more. Today’s Jewish Quarter residents are practicing Jews, many of them coming from English speaking countries. Along with plenty of religious schools that cater for Jewish youth from abroad, the Jewish Quarter, like the German Colony has a strong Anglophone appeal. Major attractions in the quarter include the Western Wall, the Cardo, the Hurva Synagoge, the Bunt House and the Four Sephardi Synagogues.

Nachlaot Neighbourhood Jerusalem

Nachlaot Neighbourhood Jerusalem

Located in the center of the city, providing a bridge between the uptown feel of Rechavia, to the authentic Machane Yehuda market, is Nachlaot. The old neighborhood provides a unique glimpse to the first days of western Jerusalem The establishment of the neighborhood began back in the 1800s and was made possible thanks to Sir Moshe Montefiore who donated many of the funding for it. Built in the beginning with divided areas for the Ashkenazi and Sephardi congregations, it didn’t take much time until the neighborhood became bigger thanks to the help of new immigrants from Europe and beyond. Most of the buildings from that time still exist today and have signs with pictures and information from the time of their first inhabitants. Mahane Yehuda Market Once occupied mostly by a population of elderly religious people, today, Nachlaot has transformed into an artistic neighborhood attracting students studying in various art schools in Jerusalem. Having said this, Nachlaot, like many of the other neighborhoods in Jerusalem, has become a magnet to many American Jews who are buying property in it for personal use or as an investment. Those who will take a stroll down the streets of Nachlaot, will witness this odd blend of hippies and Yiddish speaking ultra orthodox Jews, all coming back from the market with groceries on Fridays at noon.

Western Wall Tunnel

Western Wall Tunnel

Descend into the Jewish nation's history in the 322-meter underground tunnel, at the spot closest to where the Temple once stood. The Western Wall Tunnel was discovered 150 years ago, but was only opened to the general public in 1984. In 1996, the exit from the tunnel to the Via Dolorosa was breached. A visit to the tunnel is an experience that will fill visitors with awe, as it combines mythical forces, legends, history and politics – all in the spot closest to the remnants of the Holy Temple. The underground tunnels span the length of the Western Wall, under the homes in the Old City of Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter. The site contains spaces that have been connected to allow visitors to pass between the different splendid structures and the homes from the era of the Second Temple, the foundations of the Crusader church and buildings from the Middle Ages, wells, quarries, a canal from the Hasmonean period and more. The Western Wall is recognized as a 62-meter remnant of the Temple, though the tunnels reveal that it actually extends 488 meters. A tour of the tunnels begins at the entrance gate adjacent to the Western Wall platform, through a passageway to the largest of the tunnel halls, which contains a model of the Temple Mount, Temple and Muslim Quarter. Continue towards the Western Wall itself, which displays a building method unique to the Herodian Era, an imprecise style that grants the Western Wall a particularly impressive look, with engineering reinforcement. Visitors pass to Warren's Gate, which is now blocked with cement, but was one of the four gates to the Temple Mount during the Second Temple period, through which individuals could reach the Holy of the Holies (Kodesh Hakodashim): The Foundation Stone from which, according to the Jewish faith, the world was created and on which the Holy Arc stood in the First and Second Temples. At the end of the tunnel, visitors reach a Herodian street, with the original stones still intact, that was used by the city's upper class, merchants and Roman monarchy. From there, visitors continue on to the stunning Hasmonean canal from the second century B.C.E., at the end of which they reach the Lark Pool, under the Congregation of Notre-Dame de Sion; another right turn in the short tunnel will lead to the Via Dolorosa in the Old City. Entrance to the Western Wall Tunnel must be coordinated in advance, and is available for groups of up to 30 people, which must be accompanied a guide. Individuals can join groups (cost: NIS 7-18). The site is closed on Saturdays. For more information and to coordinate a visit, call 02-627-1333.

Rockefeller Museum Jerusalem

Rockefeller Museum Jerusalem

The Rockefeller Museum is located in East Jerusalem, opposite Herod's Gate. The museum was designed by renowned British architect Austen St. Barbe Harrison in the 1930s. In his beautifully impressive architectural design, Harrison successfully merged east and west. The museum, which opened in 1938, exhibits numerous important historical findings from Jerusalem and around Israel, found mostly during the British Mandate period. Among the items on display: A collection of gold jewelry, Megiddo ivory collection, Lachish letter ostracon and decorated wooden doorposts from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The museum's exhibit halls have high ceilings, inspired by the Roman halls built around a beautiful courtyard with three different levels. Rockefeller Museum Jerusalem Address: Sultan Suleiman 27, Jerusalem (near Herod's Gate, a short drive from Safra Square, parallel to the Old City walls). Telephone: 02-628-2251

Burnt House in Wohl Archaeological Museum Jerusalem

Burnt House in Wohl Archaeological Museum Jerusalem

The Burnt House is an excavated house situated six meters below current street level, The house is dated to the Second Temple period located in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem and is believed to have been set on fire during the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE. The Burnt House is a magnificent structure, located some six meters underground, found during excavations of the “Upper City.” It is named so because it serves as a unique testimony to the destruction of Jerusalem during the first century, and the fire set by the Romans. Archaeologists at the site discovered stone tablets, grindstones and ovens, large pitchers, bowls and measuring cups, and researchers believe that there was a perfume workshop at the site. Apparently the house was burned during the Roman conquest of the “Upper City” , in the large fire that also engulfed the Temple. The structure is also called Kathros House because of an inscription found at the site. The Kathros family was one of four priestly families that abused their positions.

Hurva Synagogue in Jerusalem’s Old City

Hurva Synagogue in Jerusalem’s Old City

The Hurva Synagogue is located in the Jewish Quarter in Jerusalem's Old City. The synagogue was built in the 18th century, and has gone through many upheavals: It was destroyed by Muslims, rebuilt in the 19th century, destroyed again, and in 1948 - after the Old City was occupied - it was renovated yet again, and it was reopened in March 2010. A sound and light show is screened on the structure's eastern wall, surveying the synagogue's 800-year history (the show is presented free of charge in the evening hours). The Hurva Synagogue is named after Rabbi Yehuda he-Hasid, who headed Poland's Jewish community in the 18th century. Rabbi Yehuda he-Hasid immigrated to the land of Israel, with his students, some 300 years ago, to advance the Messianic Era. The rabbi and his students bought an abandoned plot on which to build a synagogue, financed by loans which they used to pay the landowners. Rabbi Yehuda he-Hasid died just days after an acquisition agreement was reached; his students remained a flock without a shepherd, but were able to raise funds from the Diaspora and take out loans from local Arab residents in order to continue the plan to construct a splendid synagogue. After some twenty years, Muslims set the synagogue and the Torah scrolls in it ablaze, claiming that they were not paid what they had been owed, and that the place had become The Ruin of Yehuda he-Hasid. Because of the debt, the Ashkenazi Jews were expelled from Jerusalem and those who wanted to enter the city had to disguise themselves as Sephardic Jews - in dress and style - so as not to be identified. After 140 years, during Turkish rule, the decree against Ashkenazi Jews was reversed and construction of the synagogue was renewed, funded by Moses Montefiore and Baron Alphonse, a brother of Baron Edmond Benjamin James de Rothschild. The structure of the splendid synagogue was planned in the neo-Byzantine style, which characterized many houses of worship throughout the Ottoman Empire and included four square towers with four 16-meters arches between them. Over the arches rose a large, spectacular dome. The synagogue became a spiritual center in Jerusalem's Old City, until the 1948 War of Independence. During the war, the synagogue was bombed, the structure collapsed and was destroyed, and only two pillars remained standing. After the 1967 Six Day War, as part of renovation activities in the Jewish Quarter, wide-spread construction work commenced, alongside archaeological digs in which artifacts from different eras were discovered, including: Mikvehs (ritual baths) from the time of the Second Temple and a street from the Byzantine Period, which are displayed in the synagogue basement. The synagogue was inaugurated and reopened on March 15, 2010.

Abu Gosh

Abu Gosh

Abu Gosh is a lovely, picturesque village located in the Judean Hills, off a winding road between Tel Avi and Jerusalem, dating back some 6,000 years. The village is situated on a mountainside and serves as a tourist attraction, drawing in many visitors. The village is particularly famous for its hummus restaurants. You may not reach the original Abu Shukri restaurant, but there are many restaurants serving authentic and particularly tasty food throughout the village, at affordable prices. Aside from the famous restaurants, twice a year – during Sukkot and Shavuot - the village holds a vocal music festival. The festival hosts choirs from across the country and around the world, which perform in the village's monasteries. The village has a number of guest houses, gift shops, candle shops and glassware stores. The atmosphere in the village is unique, as it serves as a meeting point for the three religions: Jewish Israelis and tourists from around the world visit the Muslim village in order to hear music at a Christian church. During Biblical times the village was called Kiryat Ye'arim. The Ark of the Covenant was placed there and it was a site for religious rituals. Later, during the Byzantine period, a church was built on the highest point in the village. This church was destroyed during the Persian occupation, and The Church of Our Lady of the Ark of the Covenant - which features a large statue of the Virgin Mary - was built on its ruins. These days, nuns live in the church and twice a year, during Sukkot and Shavuot, it hosts choirs from across Israel and around the world during the vocal music festival. According to Christian belief, Abu Gosh is where Jesus appeared following his resurrection. During the Crusader period a church and stunning monastery were built in the village, which have been preserved to this day. The Benedictine Monastery is surrounded by a huge, lovely garden with ancient olive trees, an orchard and grapevines. The monastery's interior walls feature frescos that were drawn during the thirteenth century, and a spring flows from the monastery's crypt. The site also houses a ceramics and candle factory, operated by the monks. Six daily prayer sessions are held at the monastery, from 5:30 A.M.-8:30 P.M., and visitors are encouraged to visit during one of the sessions, for the unique opportunity to hear prayer songs performed in an 800-year-old church. Monastery Visiting Hours: Monday-Wednesday and Friday-Saturday: 8:30 A.M.-11:30 A.M. and 2:30 P.M.-5:30 P.M.

Mahane Yehuda Market – A Day at “The Shuk”

Mahane Yehuda Market – A Day at “The Shuk”

One of the most colorful spots in Jerusalem and a must visit for any tourist to the city, is the vibrant Mahane Yehuda Market, or "The Shuk" as they say in Hebrew. Whether you decide to visit it on Friday, its busiest day in the week, or on any other weekday, there are quite a few milestone's in the market which are a delight for the eye and of course the palate. Located between Jaffa and Agripas St. "The Shuk" can be easily reached by walking from the bus station or by almost any bus route in Jerusalem. Inside, it is divided by streets named after fruits and has both an open aired area and a covered one. With over 250 vendors in the market, selling mostly foods from a large variety of Jewish communities from all over the world, even if one plans on simply absorbing the market through his senses, it's always a good idea to have a list with the market's finest restaurants and vendors, to make the best out of your day in the market. Here is a Virtual tour of the Mahane Yehuda Market >> Marzipan, 44 Agripas St. Start off just before entering the market at the famous Marzipan bakery. Besides having a name after a delicious almond treat, Marzipan is famous for its sweet pastries dispersing its fragrances from outside the market. If you're a chocolate lover (and who isn't?), don't miss out on their famous chocolate rogalach, yummy. Uzi-Eli, 10 Ha'egoz St. Take a right from Agripas St. into the first entrance of the covered market on Ha'egoz St. (Nut St. in Hebrew) and walk until you reach a picturesque juice stand on your right called Uzi-Eli. Uziel the owner, is a cute looking 68 year old man originally from Yemen who's referred to as "The Dr." Besides his juices which are said to have unique healing qualities from helping headaches to improving your stamina, the doctor offers creams and sprays as well for the skin and will happily give you your own personal diagnosis. The Halva Kingdom, 75 Etz Ha'haim St. Once you get to Hashaked St. (Almond), turn right and then left on Etz Ha'haim St. (Tree of Life) and walk until you see a large halva stand to the left, known as The Halva Kingdom. There you'll find every kind of sweet tahini and honey mixture you could ever dream of, plus a few baklavas if you have an endless sweet tooth. Make sure to try the excellent King's Halva and maybe even take a few packs with you back home – where the sweet delight will be even more appreciated. Ha'agas Ehad, 1 Banay St. Located in the heart of the market on the old Pear St. (Ha'agas) is Ha'agas Ehad. Although today the street is named Banay St., after Eliyahu Yaakov Banay, one of the four fathers of the famous Banay family in Israel, we can still find on the same spot, the well known fresh vegan cuisine restaurant, Ha'agas Ehad. If at this point of the day your only craving is for a salad, no doubt this place would be your best choice. Mizrahi, 12 Hashazif St. Another famous establishment of the market, on Hashazif St. (Plum) parallel to Banay St. is the Mizrahi restaurant. Once a home to a spice stand, today, the daughter of the spice stand owner, runs a family based restaurant called Mizrahi, serving deliciously authentic cuisine on Kerosene stoves. Mazetim, 11 Hashazif St. Just across the restaurant, if you're thinking of eating in, is a great cheese shop called Mazetim, where you can get the best cheeses from all over the country and abroad. Just be careful while walking around the shop, near almost every cheese you can find a few cut squares from it for you to try, not the best for someone on a diet. Mousseline, 17 Ha'egoz St. Another thing that's best to stay away from if on a diet is Mousseline ice-cream shop. Fairly new to the market, back on Ha'egoz St, Mousseline has already managed to get quite a fan base for itself, with hard ice-cream addicts going crazy for their odd but tasty basil grapefruit flavor. The Iraqi Shuk After so much eating it might be a good idea to relax a bit and watch others relax as well. The Iraqi part of the market, set in its back is probably a good bet for that. Watch a large group of diverse grandfathers (not only Iraqi) play backgammon and cards, relaxing under the sun, either rain or shine. Try talking to them, if you look naïve enough, they might even let you play with them… Hachipuria, 6 Eshkol St. If you become hungry after your backgammon game, take a right when coming out of the Iraqi market just before going back into the shuk, to Eshkol St. There in a Georgian bakery, you can enjoy some yummy Georgian cuisine consisting mostly of cheese and dough. Hachipuria has a large variety of oily dough with cheese but if still on a diet, just take a sip of their local Georgian drink. Mahneyuda, 10 Beit Ya'akov St. Oddly enough, the one thing your day out to "The Shuk" won't be complete without is a visit to a new restaurant just outside the market named Mahneyuda. Run by three of the best chefs that Jerusalem has to offer, Mahneyuda prouds itself in having a different menu everyday, printed daily on recycled paper, that's decided on according to the catch of the day from the market. With small to main courses set by prices from low to high (only up to 130 NIS per course) on the menu and an open kitchen where you can actually see how the food is made, there's no wonder one needs to book at least two days in advance to get a table. The people, the smells, the flavors and the sounds of the bustling market will all boil down as night sets on Jerusalem. At that point you can find yourself going back to your hotel after a crazy but definitely filling day at "The Shuk".

Time Elevator, Jerusalem

Time Elevator, Jerusalem

The Time Elevator takes visitors on a fascinating, historical journey over 3,000 years, telling the story of the city of Jerusalem. Haim Topol, who starred in Fiddler on the Roof, is our tour guide, leading us between collapsing ceilings, water hoses and other special effects that enhance the experience and the unforgettable journey to historical Jerusalem: From the City of David through the 1967 War. With an exciting original film written by historians and archeologists, featuring special effects, viewers can enjoy a fascinating journey to the most dramatic moments in Jerusalem's history. Visitors meet the Prophet Jeremiah, confront King Zedekiah and relive the destruction of the First and Second Temples. The audience goes through the Roman occupation of Jerusalem, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, hundreds of years of occupation in the Holy Land and the drama of the establishment of the State of Israel. Visitors are provided with surround sound headphones and may choose to listen to the show in English, Russian, French, Spanish, German, Mandarin, Italian or Hebrew. A visit to the Time Elevator has become an important and essential part of each visit to Jerusalem.

Israel Museum, Jerusalem – Buy tickets online

Israel Museum, Jerusalem – Buy tickets online

Since its establishment in 1965, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem has become one of the leading institutions in Israel and one of the most important and comprehensive museums in the world. The museum features upwards of 500,000 artistic and archaeological exhibits, including the world's leading collection on archaeology from the Holy Land, Judaica and Jewish ethnography, and works of art ranging from classical to modern. The collections represent the rich history of human culture, dating back almost one million years, through modern times. The Israel Museum offers a wide range of fascinating exhibits, activities for the entire family and special events at the Shrine of the Book, a model of Jerusalem's Second Temple, activities in the Youth Department and a 24-dunam sculpture garden. This summer, museum renovations will be complete and it will feature new programs, fascinating exhibits and interesting activities. Special opening hours during the first week after reopening: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday (July 26-28): 10:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Thursday (July 29): 10:00 A.M. to 1:00 A.M. Opening Hours Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Tuesday: 4:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. Friday and Holiday Eve: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Saturdays and Holidays: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Get your Ticket >>

Jerusalem in the time of the Second Temple

Jerusalem in the time of the Second Temple

A Journey following Jerusalem in the time of the Second Temple The Second Temple period, between 538 BCE and 70 CE is considered to be a time of Jerusalem's glory. This is due to the magnificent castles and walls that were built in the city, especially towards the end of the 600 years, with the rise of King Herod. The temple, built in 516 BCE by the Jews returning to Zion after the Babylonian exile was the heart of the city till its destruction in 70 CE. Having said that, one must understand, that the political and social situation in those days was extremely complex, with so many different religious streams trying to get hold of the spiritual leadership in Jerusalem, it seems that the rip inside the Jews, was what inevitably brought to Jerusalem's destruction by the Romans. This suggested tour follows some of the archeological milestones of the time through the old city and its surroundings, which give light to the historical period and political background of the time as well. Probably the best way to start off the journey would be by visiting the Model of Jerusalem in the late second Temple Period, located at the Israel Museum. The model, which is the size of 2,000 square meters at a 1:50 ratio, displays the entire city at that time from a birds view, showing off the temple and the roads and buildings surrounding it. After having seen the model and understanding the destruction the city went through (by comparison to what's left today) it's time to go to the Old City. Entering through Jaffa gate, we will already be able to see parts of the Second temple's time architecture. Originally believed to have been built by King David, the Tower of David situated at the entrance to the old city, was actually built during the time of the second temple by the Hashmonaim, as noted by Josephus Flavius, a historian who lived in the time of the great revolt. Later on it received a face lift and two more towers around it, as part of Herod's plans of glorifying the city. After the destruction of the city once more, the ancient citadel continued to serve the Romans as barracks for their soldiers. Throughout the years, the tower had been destructed and reconstructed by many, yet still the lower layers of the tower and of the old wall, are genuine to the period. Passing the tower, we head to the Jewish Quarter to the Wahl Museum of Archeology, also known as the Herodian Suburb. The museum depicts life in the time of the second temple in Jerusalem. Original mosaics, stone tools and various objects of art portray the high quality of life experienced at the time in the city. In order to complete the picture it's recommended to continue to the excavated Burnt House, said to have been burned by the Romans, where you can watch a 12 minute audio–visual presentation about the political and social events which led to the house's burning. Ending the tour near the western wall, you can either choose to walk underground through the Western Wall Tunnels, where you can take a tour of the most ancient layers of the wall, or walk above ground in the area of The Archeological Garden of Jerusalem. There you can see the excavated Robinson's Arch which once stood at the southwestern corner of the Temple Mount as well as the old market street and the steps that used to lead to the temple up until 70 CE.

Tower of David Museum – Night Spectacular

Tower of David Museum – Night Spectacular

Tower of David Museum – Night Spectacular The citadel walls serve as the backdrop for this stunning nighttime performance, which is a celebration of sights and sounds projected on the archaeological remnants in the citadel courtyard. The impressive story of the city of Jerusalem is conveyed, accompanied by original music, dramatized by huge, breathtaking imagery. The sound and light show uses the advanced, innovative trompe-l’œi technique, as fascinating scenes seem to replace the walls and remnants of the buildings. The impressive imagery envelops the audience, providing a multi-sensory, unique experience. Innovative techniques are provided through advanced computer systems that include twenty projectors, ten video devices, 14 computers and 14 speakers. In addition, the system includes some ten kilometers of cables and two projection rooms. Producers: Skertzo, from France; Original Score: Etienne Perruchon; Sound Effects: Jean Goudier; Curator: Renee Sivan, Tower of David Museum. The sound and light show is the first of its kind in the world and is aimed at tourists, Israeli audiences, families, speakers of all languages and anyone who loves Jerusalem, all of whom will enjoy the performance. The show is sponsored by the Jerusalem Municipality, Tourism Ministry, the Jerusalem Foundation and the Israel Government Tourist Corporation. Show Dates: Every day after dark. For exact times please check… http://www.inisrael.com/news/?p=1025

The Western Wall Virtual tour – Visit the Kotel

The Western Wall Virtual tour – Visit the Kotel

The Western Wall also called the Wailing wall, is the western retaining wall of the Temple Mount, the one that was closest to the Holy of Holies when the Temple stood. The holiest Jewish site in the world and a renowned symbol of Jerusalem’s Old City, the Western Wall is a remnant of the retaining wall built by Herod the Great in the 1st century BC, to encompass the Second Temple enclosure. As the only remainder of their sacred, destroyed Temple, Jewish people from all over the world, throughout two thousands years of exile, have faced the direction of the Western Wall on their prayers. It is a Jewish belief that the Holy Presence has never left the Western Wall, thus it became the most significant site of Jewish pilgrimage, where Jews came to mourn the ruin of the Temple. This is how the Wall, “Ha’kotel” in Hebrew, has gained the name – the “Wailing Wall”. The big plaza in front of the Wall is divided into two sections – one for women and one for men. Here you can observe different kinds of Jewish activities and prayers, from orthodox Jews dressed in black reading their bible, to Israeli soldiers and groups of Jewish tourists. Leaning against the Wall and kissing the stones, the prayers’ most famous custom is to insert a note with a prayer to God between the Wall’s bricks, believing in its priority to be answered. The Western Wall serves as a favorite location for Jewish traditional celebrations, and gets amazingly alive on Friday eve (the arrival of Sabbath) and on Jewish holidays. While visiting the Kotel you may see a Bar Mitzvah kid holding the Torah on his traditional ceremony, or an excited bride & groom being photographed before their wedding. Information: The Western Wall is open 24 hours, and requires a modest dress for women and a head cover for the men. Admission is free. The closest gate to enter the Old City directly to the Wall is the Dung Gate. Buses No. 1 and 2 reach inside the Old City to the area of the Wall. http://www.inisrael.com/news/?p=55

Israel Museum, Jerusalem – Buy tickets online

Israel Museum, Jerusalem – Buy tickets online

Since its establishment in 1965, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem has become one of the leading institutions in Israel and one of the most important and comprehensive museums in the world. The museum features upwards of 500,000 artistic and archaeological exhibits, including the world’s leading collection on archaeology from the Holy Land, Judaica and Jewish ethnography, and works of art ranging from classical to modern. The collections represent the rich history of human culture, dating back almost one million years, through modern times. The Israel Museum offers a wide range of fascinating exhibits, activities for the entire family and special events at the Shrine of the Book, a model of Jerusalem’s Second Temple, activities in the Youth Department and a 24-dunam sculpture garden. This summer, museum renovations will be complete and it will feature new programs, fascinating exhibits and interesting activities. Special opening hours during the first week after reopening: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday (July 26-28): 10:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Thursday (July 29): 10:00 A.M. to 1:00 A.M. Opening Hours Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Tuesday: 4:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. Friday and Holiday Eve: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Saturdays and Holidays: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. http://www.inisrael.com/news/?p=1069

The Muslim Quarter Virual Tour

The Muslim Quarter Virual Tour

The Muslim Quarter is one of the four quarters of the ancient, walled Old City of Jerusalem, the other three being the Jewish Quarter, the Christian Quarter and the Armenian Quarter. The Muslim Quarter is the largest and most populous of the four quarters and is situated in the northeastern corner of the Old City, extending from the Lions' Gate in the east, along the northern wall of the Temple Mount in the south, to the Damascus Gate - Western Wall route in the west. The Via Dolorosa road starts in the quarter. http://3disrael.com/jerusalem/muslim_quarter.cfm

The Old City Market in Jerusalem

The Old City Market in Jerusalem

Set along narrow alleys, mostly within the Muslim Quarter, the Old City of Jerusalem is famous with its colorful market called "Shuk" in Hebrew. The market offers a fascinating variety of lively shops and stalls, from mixed nuts and spices, to different kinds of sweets and pastries, vegetables and falafel, along with souvenirs, ceramics and oriental jewels and cloths. Walking around the market you are likely to see the Arab vendors carrying green carts full of their famous delicious bagels, while others are busy selling their goods to the passing tourists. Do not hesitate to bargain for lower prices, it is commonly acceptable. http://www.inisrael.com/tour/jer/vt_market.htm

Virtual Tour – The Western Wall of Jerusalem

Virtual Tour – The Western Wall of Jerusalem

The holiest Jewish site in the world and a renowned symbol of Jerusalem's Old City, the Western Wall is a remnant of the retaining wall built by Herod the Great in the 1st century BC, to encompass the Second Temple enclosure. As the only remainder of their sacred, destroyed Temple, Jewish people from all over the world, throughout two thousands years of exile, have faced the direction of the Western Wall on their prayers. It is a Jewish belief that the Holy Presence has never left the Western Wall, thus it became the most significant site of Jewish pilgrimage, where Jews came to mourn the ruin of the Temple. This is how the Wall, "Ha'kotel" in Hebrew, has gained the name - the "Wailing Wall". The big plaza in front of the Wall is divided into two sections - one for women and one for men. Here you can observe different kinds of Jewish activities and prayers, from orthodox Jews dressed in black reading their bible, to Israeli soldiers and groups of Jewish tourists. Leaning against the Wall and kissing the stones, the prayers' most famous custom is to insert a note with a prayer to God between the Wall's bricks, believing in its priority to be answered. The Western Wall serves as a favorite location for Jewish traditional celebrations, and gets amazingly alive on Friday eve (the arrival of Sabbath) and on Jewish holidays. While visiting the Kotel you may see a Bar Mitzvah kid holding the Torah on his traditional ceremony, or an excited bride & groom being photographed before their wedding. Information: The Western Wall is open 24 hours, and requires a modest dress for women and a head cover for the men. Admission is free. The closest gate to enter the Old City directly to the Wall is the Dung Gate. Buses No. 1 and 2 reach inside the Old City to the area of the Wall.

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem named after the Tish family, or in short the Biblical Zoo, is a zoo located on Derech Aharon Shulov 1 in Jerusalem, on the northern slopes of Nahal Refaim near Ein Yael and Ein Lavan springs. The uniqueness of the zoo is in presenting a zoological collection of Eretz Israel animals, some of which have even been mentioned in the Bible. This zoo is one of the six zoos that are members of the Israeli Zoo Organization. According to the "Dun & Bradstreet" rating - the Biblical Zoo was the most popular attraction in Israel between the years 2005-2007, and in 2009 738,000 visitors were registered. The zoo is uniquely built and displays the animals while integrating into the landscape. The park was designed by architect Lenny Raviv of the Miller Bloom Environmental Planning Office [14], with the goal of giving animals as similar conditions as possible to the conditions in nature. The animals are not in cages, and between the crowd and the animals there are deep ditches that prevent contact between the animals and visitors. The gene is divided into several areas, with each area having animals according to a certain category (for example, according to the continent from which the animals came). Adjacent to the park is the Jerusalem Railway Station - the Biblical Zoo, which began operating in the second half of the 1990s and reopened in 2005 and closed when the new Jerusalem - Yitzhak Navon Railway Station opened in 2018. Archaeological excavations have been carried out in the area of ​​the zoo and the remains of agricultural farms dating from the third millennium BC have been discovered. Most of the exhibits discovered in the area date from the Middle Bronze Age (the first half of the second millennium BC). At the end of the African Yard route is the Zoo Visitor Center in the shape of a Noah’s Ark where there is a kiosk, a movie theater and a souvenir shop. The center was established by Aharon Shulov in 1990 with the first film in the cinema hall that tells about the construction of the biblical zoo. Opening hours: Sun-Thu 09:00-18:00 Fri 09:00-16:00 Sat 09:00-17:00

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