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Tower of David Museum Jerusalem
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Tower of David Museum Jerusalem

Tower of David Museum Jerusalem

Jerusalem travel guide

Set in the magnificently restored ancient Citadel’ first constructed 2,000 years ago by Herod the Great, the Tower of David Museum traces Jerusalem long and eventful history through state-of-the-art displays and exhibits’ utilizing the most advanced technologies. Canaanites and Hebrews, Greeks and Romans, Crusaders, Muslims, Turks, British, and Israelis are richly presented and seek harmony within the age-old walls. The panoramic route along the Citadel towers with its most breathtaking views of the city and the lush archaelogical gardens, all add to an experience you will cherish.

For the first time, the City of David reveals the story of the revival of ancient Jerusalem in a unique and exciting show screened in the first groundbreaking technology of its kind in Israel, on top of the antiquities of the City of David, under the open sky!

More than 2,500 years ago, Jerusalem was destroyed – and the Babylonian exile began.

The story of the revival of ancient Jerusalem is told through an advanced technological show projected on the antiquities of the City of David – right where history took place.

The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem

The Western Wall Time Line Jerusalem

1000 BC – Purchasing Mount Moria King David conquered Jerusalem, which was a Jebusite city located on the Ophel hill, southeast of today’s Old City area. He bought a neighboring hill, which was later identified with Mount Moria (the site of Isaac’s sacrifice), on which he placed the Ark of the Covenant. 950 BC – The Construction of the First Temple King Solomon, the son of David, built the First Temple on Mount Moria, which known today as the Temple Mount. 586 BC – The Destruction of the First Temple Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, conquered Jerusalem, burnt the Temple and exiled the Jews to Babylon. 515 BC – The Construction of the Second Temple In 537 BC, after 50 years in the Babylonian exile, the Jews were allowed to return to Jerusalem and began to rebuild the city and the Temple. The Second Temple was completed in 515 BC. Model of Second Temple 37- 4 BC – Herod’s Temple Herod the Great was appointed to the King of Judah and begun to reconstruct the Second Temple and to build the Temple Mount. He built an incredibly magnificent temple and a retaining wall around the Temple Mount enclosure. 70 AD – The Destruction of the Second Temple The Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans led to the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Temple by Titus. The only remnant left was the western part of the Temple Mount’s retaining wall, which became the focal point of the Jewish people throughout the centuries. The authentic bricks of that wall can be seen at the bottom rows of today’s Western Wall. May 14, 1948 – The Western Wall Falls to Jordanian Hands A few hours after the official proclamation of the state of Israel, the Arab armies of the neighboring countries invaded Israel, and the terrible War of Independence begun. The Old City of Jerusalem, with the Western Wall in its center, fell to Jordanian legionnaires. Western Wall – Virtual Tour June 7, 1967 – Israel Regains Control of the Western Wall During the Six Days War and after 19 years, in which the access to the Wall was prevented from the Jews, the Israeli army recaptured the Old City of Jerusalem, and liberated the Western Wall. The Year 2000 – E-Communication with the Western Wall Maintaining the old tradition of placing a note with a prayer to God in the Wall’s bricks, the era of High Technology and e-communication provides a virtual answer for those who like to send their prayers to God, without actually visiting the Wall. The believer can now send his request via e-mail or fax and it will be placed between the Wall’s bricks.

Mount Herzl, Herzl Museum

Mount Herzl, Herzl Museum

The National Cemetery of the State of Israel is located on Mount Herzl in western Jerusalem. Among the graves on this hill are the country's main military cemetery and the plot of the greats of the nation, where the nation's leaders and Zionists are buried. Herzl Museum is located at the top of the mountain, where the National Memorial Hall commemorates all those who have fallen in defense of the country since 2017. The main ceremonies on Remembrance Day for the Fallen of Israel are held on Mount Herzl in memory of those who have fallen in the IDF, the Israel Police, and during hostilities. The president, prime minister and head of state all participate in these ceremonies. This ceremony opens Independence Day. In the Jerusalem Forest between Ein Kerem, Kiryat Yuval, Beit HaKerem, Beit Vagan, Yaffe Nof and Har Nof, the mountain rises to an elevation of 834 meters above sea level. Located next to Mount Herzl, Yad Vashem built the Mount of Remembrance on the shoulder next to it. Located on Mount Herzl's main entrance plaza, the Herzl Museum in Jerusalem showcases the practice and vision of Benjamin Ze'ev Herzl. In honor of Herzl's 100th birthday, the museum was renovated, upgraded, and reopened. In the new museum are four audiovisual presentations: one on Herzl's path to Zionism, one on his Zionist activities, one on Herzl's room, and a fourth on the comparison between Herzl's vision in Altneuland and the achievements of the State of Israel. As part of the museum, Herzl's original study will also be featured. There are four four-dimensional films at the new museum, which describe Herzl's life and contributions to Zionism, his involvement in Zionist politics, and his vision outlined in Altneuland. The museum complex includes two educational centers related to Zionism, managed by the World Zionist Organization.

Discovering Abu Gosh: A Historic Village of Hummus, Music and Monasteries

Discovering Abu Gosh: A Historic Village of Hummus, Music and Monasteries

Abu Gosh is a lovely, picturesque village located in the Judean Hills, off a winding road between Tel Avi and Jerusalem, dating back some 6,000 years. The village is situated on a mountainside and serves as a tourist attraction, drawing in many visitors. The village is particularly famous for its hummus restaurants. You may not reach the original Abu Shukri restaurant, but there are many restaurants serving authentic and particularly tasty food throughout the village, at affordable prices. Aside from the famous restaurants, twice a year – during Sukkot and Shavuot - the village holds a vocal music festival. The festival hosts choirs from across the country and around the world, which perform in the village's monasteries. The village has a number of guest houses, gift shops, candle shops and glassware stores. The atmosphere in the village is unique, as it serves as a meeting point for the three religions: Jewish Israelis and tourists from around the world visit the Muslim village in order to hear music at a Christian church. During Biblical times the village was called Kiryat Ye'arim. The Ark of the Covenant was placed there and it was a site for religious rituals. Later, during the Byzantine period, a church was built on the highest point in the village. This church was destroyed during the Persian occupation, and The Church of Our Lady of the Ark of the Covenant - which features a large statue of the Virgin Mary - was built on its ruins. These days, nuns live in the church and twice a year, during Sukkot and Shavuot, it hosts choirs from across Israel and around the world during the vocal music festival. According to Christian belief, Abu Gosh is where Jesus appeared following his resurrection. During the Crusader period a church and stunning monastery were built in the village, which have been preserved to this day. The Benedictine Monastery is surrounded by a huge, lovely garden with ancient olive trees, an orchard and grapevines. The monastery's interior walls feature frescos that were drawn during the thirteenth century, and a spring flows from the monastery's crypt. The site also houses a ceramics and candle factory, operated by the monks. Six daily prayer sessions are held at the monastery, from 5:30 A.M.-8:30 P.M., and visitors are encouraged to visit during one of the sessions, for the unique opportunity to hear prayer songs performed in an 800-year-old church. Monastery Visiting Hours: Monday-Wednesday and Friday-Saturday: 8:30 A.M.-11:30 A.M. and 2:30 P.M.-5:30 P.M.

Jerusalem - one of a kind
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