Hotels Locations

more locations
hide locations
inisrael.com travel guide

Search for

Enjoy Israel

HE
Nachlaot Neighbourhood Jerusalem
inisrael.com travel guide

Israel Hotels

Enjoy Israel

Nachlaot Neighbourhood Jerusalem

Jerusalem travel guide

Located in the center of the city, providing a bridge between the uptown feel of Rechavia, to the authentic Machane Yehuda market, is Nachlaot. The old neighborhood provides a unique glimpse to the first days of western Jerusalem

The establishment of the neighborhood began back in the 1800s and was made possible thanks to Sir Moshe Montefiore who donated many of the funding for it. Built in the beginning with divided areas for the Ashkenazi and Sephardi congregations, it didn’t take much time until the neighborhood became bigger thanks to the help of new immigrants from Europe and beyond. Most of the buildings from that time still exist today and have signs with pictures and information from the time of their first inhabitants.

Mahane Yehuda Market

Once occupied mostly by a population of elderly religious people, today, Nachlaot has transformed into an artistic neighborhood attracting students studying in various art schools in Jerusalem. Having said this, Nachlaot, like many of the other neighborhoods in Jerusalem, has become a magnet to many American Jews who are buying property in it for personal use or as an investment.

Those who will take a stroll down the streets of Nachlaot, will witness this odd blend of hippies and Yiddish speaking ultra orthodox Jews, all coming back from the market with groceries on Fridays at noon.

The Twin Cave - attractions around Jerusalem

The Twin Cave - attractions around Jerusalem

The Twin Cave is an ancient cave intertwined with stories and discoveries from the time of the Maccabees and stories about different types of bats that find their favorite cool and dark place. The route leading to the cave lasts less than an hour in each direction and is not particularly difficult, children aged 4 and over will manage without help most of the time. The tour of the cool and humid cave is especially pleasant after the heat outside and you should enter with personal flashlights if you want to see their way. In the depths of the Twin Caves springs a spring that some believe have healing properties for its waters. Up the road, minutes after the cave opens, you can glide on a natural slide made of very smooth rock. The children will be able to spend long minutes of fun there and so will you. The cave is not open to visitors at a time when the bats are sleeping their winter sleep. The cave is not far from the Stalactite Cave a short distance from Beit Shemesh and Jerusalem.

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem named after the Tish family, or in short the Biblical Zoo, is a zoo located on Derech Aharon Shulov 1 in Jerusalem, on the northern slopes of Nahal Refaim near Ein Yael and Ein Lavan springs. The uniqueness of the zoo is in presenting a zoological collection of Eretz Israel animals, some of which have even been mentioned in the Bible. This zoo is one of the six zoos that are members of the Israeli Zoo Organization. According to the "Dun & Bradstreet" rating - the Biblical Zoo was the most popular attraction in Israel between the years 2005-2007, and in 2009 738,000 visitors were registered. The zoo is uniquely built and displays the animals while integrating into the landscape. The park was designed by architect Lenny Raviv of the Miller Bloom Environmental Planning Office [14], with the goal of giving animals as similar conditions as possible to the conditions in nature. The animals are not in cages, and between the crowd and the animals there are deep ditches that prevent contact between the animals and visitors. The gene is divided into several areas, with each area having animals according to a certain category (for example, according to the continent from which the animals came). Adjacent to the park is the Jerusalem Railway Station - the Biblical Zoo, which began operating in the second half of the 1990s and reopened in 2005 and closed when the new Jerusalem - Yitzhak Navon Railway Station opened in 2018. Archaeological excavations have been carried out in the area of ​​the zoo and the remains of agricultural farms dating from the third millennium BC have been discovered. Most of the exhibits discovered in the area date from the Middle Bronze Age (the first half of the second millennium BC). At the end of the African Yard route is the Zoo Visitor Center in the shape of a Noah’s Ark where there is a kiosk, a movie theater and a souvenir shop. The center was established by Aharon Shulov in 1990 with the first film in the cinema hall that tells about the construction of the biblical zoo. Opening hours: Sun-Thu 09:00-18:00 Fri 09:00-16:00 Sat 09:00-17:00

Jewish Quarter - Old City Jerusalem

Jewish Quarter - Old City Jerusalem

Dating back to the days of the Turkish reign over Israel, the old city has been parted into four sections, each representing its habitants; The Jewish quarter, the Armenian quarter, the Christian quarter and the Muslim quarter. Although the Jewish Quarter is considered to be the oldest quarter in the city, dating back to the days of the bible, in terms of the architecture found in the quarter, it is considered to be the newest quarter of the four. Besides being the second smallest section in the city, most of the houses that can be found in the quarter, date back to only the 1960’s and 1970’s. During the war of independence, the quarter, that knew prosperous times during the Turkish regime, was attacked fiercely by the Jordanian forces. With only several young Palmach defenders and without any food or water, the quarter quickly found itself cut off from the rest of Jerusalem and Israel, in foreign hands. The Jordanian troops wiped out most of the Jewish houses leaving only one synagogue standing and causing the Jews of the quarter to seek refuge outside the walls of the old city. After the six day war in 1967, the archeologists seized the opportunity the recapturing of the city brought and went out on a big excavation following Jerusalem’s ancient history. The digs resulted in the exposure of the Cardo (the old market street in the Roman-Byzanite period), the Burnt House, Robinson’s Bow and many more. Today’s Jewish Quarter residents are practicing Jews, many of them coming from English speaking countries. Along with plenty of religious schools that cater for Jewish youth from abroad, the Jewish Quarter, like the German Colony has a strong Anglophone appeal. Major attractions in the quarter include the Western Wall, the Cardo, the Hurva Synagoge, the Bunt House and the Four Sephardi Synagogues.

Jerusalem - one of a kind
Please wait...
  • Please wait while the system searches for you the perfect vacation at the best prices.

Search for

Why Inisrael.com?

  • Book direct - We connect you to the hotels.
  • The best hotel deals in Israel.
  • You pay at the hotel - upon arrival.
  • Credit card for room guarantee, no upfront payment.
  • The first israel booking site since 1996.