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Step routes in Haifa
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Step routes in Haifa

Haifa travel guide

THE GERMAN COLONY

The itinerary begins at the Gedera Steps to Hahashmonaim Street. From here take a left turn to the Gamla Steps and walk about 350m. along Golomb Street to the Koresh Steps. On Arlosorov Street turn left to Buniak Steps and to Hillel Street and again to the left to Zionut Avenue and towards the Bahai site. On the right side of the Bahai Temple, descend from Shifra Street via the Shifra Steps to Abbas Street, turn left to Hacramim descent and then on Hagefen Street towards the German Colony. The views on this walk are very special and descending the scenic steps contributes to the charm. The Bahai sites, the Nazareth Nuns’ School building near the Shifra Steps and the German Colony itself complete an interesting tour. Return to the Carmel Center by bus no. 22, which does NOT run on Saturdays.

WADI NISNAS

The Step route descends to Abbas Street as in itinerary a. On Abbas Street, turn right to Zionut Avenue, continuing along Shabtai Levy Street to the Haifa Museum. From there descend to Wadi Nisnas via the Dor Steps and walk along Hawadi Street and the Market Mall on St. John’s Street. This walk, in the part below the Haifa Museum and along the Wadi Nisnas axis is characterised by the aroma of oriental foods and spices. Further down, on Ha’azmaut Street close to the port, thepavement offers multiple bargain stalls proposing. a wide open sky market. Return to the Hadar with bus no. 10 or 12 or to the Carmel Center with bus no. 22 or 37.

PARIS SQUARE

As in itineraries a and B, descend via the steps to Hahashmonaim Street. Turn right to Wingate Street and via Montefiori descend to the Spinoza Steps. After crossing Hess and Bar Giora Streets you will reach Arlosorov Street where you turn left, continue about 300m. and continue descending via the Shmuel Steps to Ben Yehuda Street again, turn left, continue about 100m. and descend to Hanevi’im Street via the Tzfat Steps. Hanevi’im Street is one of Hadar’s busiest thoroughfares and here you will find shops, cinemas, kiosks and restaurants. Walk to Shivat Zion Street and continue along Hatib Lane to Paris Square and downtown Haifa. Return to the hadar with bus no.10, 12 or to Carmel Center with bus no.22, 37.

EL PASHA

Descend to Arlosorov Street as in itinerary C. Continue to the right about 200m. and then left to Chaim Steps. From here the route crosses the classical residential area of Hadar, where houses date from the 1920s and 1930s. Continue to Yosef Street where you turn left and reach the Usha Steps after about 150m. This leads to Pevzner Street, again turn left, go on about 100m. and descend via Hillel Yafe Steps to humming Herzl Street. We cross the Nordau Pedestrian Mall which offers many restaurants, street cafes and shops. Cross Herzl Street and descend to Hehalutz Street where we turn left for about 150m. and then right to Shapira Street. Continue your descent down Ma’ale Hashihrur Street until reaching the Ajlun Steps. Here descend to the House of Mustafa EL-Halil Pasha in the old town. Tour the area and then return to the Hadar and to the Carmel Center as in itinerary B.

From Fast Food to Croissant Shawarma: A Comparison from an American Tourist's Perspective

From Fast Food to Croissant Shawarma: A Comparison from an American Tourist's Perspective

As an American tourist, I couldn't resist trying out the latest food craze in Haifa, Israel - the croissant shawarma. As a lover of fast food back home, I was intrigued by this unique combination of French pastry and Middle Eastern street food. My adventure took me to the Hazan restaurant in Haifa thanks to the help of a local friend. The moment I walked in, I felt like an outsider as the regulars gave me a curious look. But I was determined to try this new dish that everyone was talking about. The process of ordering and preparing the croissant shawarma was simple yet interesting. The workers sliced the shawarma on the spot, and I was handed a plate with paper on it to make my own croissant sandwich. The croissant was sliced in half and stuffed with a generous amount of veal shawarma, which was excellent in taste and quality. The croissant itself was slightly sweet, and the cabbage salad added a nice sour crunch. I also added some pickled vegetables from the salad bar to complete my meal. One thing that struck me was the affordability of this dish. It only cost me 30 shekels, which is equivalent to about $9 USD. In comparison, a fast food meal in the US would cost me around $10-$15, and it would not be as fresh or healthy as this croissant shawarma. As I enjoyed my meal, I couldn't help but draw comparisons to American fast food. While both cultures have their own unique fast food offerings, there is a significant difference in the quality and freshness of the ingredients. In Israel, the emphasis is on using fresh and healthy ingredients, and this is evident in the croissant shawarma dish that I had. In conclusion, I would highly recommend trying out the croissant shawarma if you ever find yourself in Haifa, Israel. It's a simple yet delicious combination that satisfies your taste buds and wallet. As an American tourist, it was refreshing to see the emphasis on fresh and healthy ingredients in fast food, and it's something that I hope catches on back home.

Tel Shekmona National Park - Excursion Route Suggestion

Tel Shekmona National Park - Excursion Route Suggestion

Discover the hidden treasures of Tel Shekmona National Park, a gem set against the stunning backdrop of Haifa's coastline. Ideal for families and romantic outings, this short and scenic route offers a blend of historical intrigue and natural beauty, suitable for all ages. Starting Point: The Sea and Lake Research Institute, Haifa End Point: Return to the starting point Historical Significance of Tel Shekmona Recent archaeological discoveries have propelled Tel Shekmona into the spotlight as a site of global historical importance. Prof. Ayelet Gilboa and Dr. Golan Shloy, from the Zinman Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa, have unveiled findings that position Tel Shekmona, once a modest seaside site on the southern edges of Haifa, as a pivotal center of ancient industry. Their research, published in the archaeological journal of Tel Aviv University, reveals that Tel Shekmona hosted the world’s largest and most productive scarlet dye factory around 3,000 years ago. This operation was a remarkable synergy of the administrative acumen of the biblical kingdom of Israel and the skilled Phoenician workers who specialized in the complex processes required to produce this valuable dye. Prof. Gilboa drew parallels between Tel Shekmona and Tel Dor during our discussion, noting their shared historical trajectories. Initially a small fishing village that also produced scarlet dye, Tel Shekmona evolved into a significant industrial facility. In contrast, Tel Dor served as a principal port city. Both sites fell under the control of the Kingdom of Israel in the ninth century B.C. According to Prof. Gilboa, the primary motive for the kingdom’s expansion into the Carmel coast was economic rather than territorial or maritime dominance. The control of crimson dye production centers, like Shekmona, was likely a strategic move to dominate this lucrative industry. These findings enrich our understanding of the historical and economic landscape of ancient Israel and highlight the sophisticated industrial activities that flourished under its influence. Route Description: Begin your journey at the iconic Sea and Lake Research Institute, located directly on the waterfront. This marks both the start and end of a leisurely route that explores the lesser-known beachfront and delves into the area’s rich history. Adjacent to Tel Shekmona is the expansive Rosh Carmel Sea Reserve, where the Carmel Ridge extends into the sea, forming a unique underwater landscape. The marine reserve, stretching from the institute to Nahal Lotem’s mouth and westward into the sea, covers about 50,000 dunams. It not only preserves historical sites from the ancient settlement of Shakmona but also showcases geological wonders like weathered dolomite and limestone, and a unique reef formed by tuber family snails. After departing from the Sea and Lake Research Institute, head south to reach the national park. Recently rejuvenated, Tel Shekmona was transformed from a neglected dumping ground into a beautifully landscaped area. The park now features native coastal vegetation and several protected species, enhancing its ecological value. Climb to the top of Tel Shakmona for a panoramic view of the sea and the city. The site, known historically as a-Smak ("Mound of the Fish"), offers a vista sprinkled with archaeological remains dating back to as early as the 15th century BC. The area was a hub during the Byzantine era, evidenced by church ruins and intricate mosaic floors uncovered in multiple archaeological digs. Continue your walk south along the boardwalk, passing by excavation sites and the hewn "hot tub" pool in the sea. Loop back north through Hecht Park and cross to Alex Garden. Near the garden, explore the ancient Shakmona caves, used historically for burial. The route concludes with a return to the Sea and Lake Research Institute. How to Reach: Access the starting point next to the Sea and Lake Research Institute via Hubert Humphrey Street in Haifa. Please Note: Swimming at the beach along this route is not permitted. Embark on this enlightening excursion at Tel Shekmona National Park, where history and nature meet the Mediterranean Sea.

City of Haifa - Special Attractions

City of Haifa - Special Attractions

Haifa is known as the capital city of the north of Israel, and has earned this title rightfully. With plenty of activities and attractions year round, whether you’re planning a day trip or a long-weekend vacation, a family trip or a romantic getaway, Haifa has much to offer. Haifa is the third largest city in Israel and is situated in the natural bay between the Mediterranean Sea and the Carmel Mountain. This unique “mountain city by the sea” offers breathtaking panoramas from almost anywhere. It enjoys the advantages of being the educational and cultural center of the north; hosting a mix of old and new urban architecture with the natural scenery of both water and forest; and a unique Mediterranean atmosphere and temperament. Home to 270,000 inhabitants, members of five different religions, living side by side in harmony, peace and mutual respect, Haifa offers a rich tapestry of contrasts and colors, varying cultures, and ethnic groups that make up the fabric of life in the city. Secular, Religious and Ultra-Orthodox Jews live side by side with Christians, Moslems, Bahai and Druze. The following is a shortlist of "Top Haifa Special Attractions": Bahai Gardens and Shrine Considered the eighth wonder of the world, this beautiful golden-domed shrine is located on the Carmel Mountain and is the site of the administrative and spiritual center of the Bahai religion. The remains of Said Ali Muhammad, one of the two founders of the Bahai religion, are buried inside the shrine. The shrine is surrounded by the spectacular Bahai gardens, planted in 1909 and nurtured ever since. The Stella Maris Carmelite Church and Monastery An impressive church of the Carmelite Order that serves as a pilgrimage center. The Church also houses a collection of antiquities. The monastery served as a hospital for Napoleon's soldiers and a monument to French soldiers was erected in front of the Church. Elijah’s Cave The focal point of Elijah the Prophet's activity, the cave has since become a pilgrimage site for believers of the three main religions. Visitors and pilgrims alike have recorded many inscriptions on the cave's walls, including Greek names and a Menorah. Gan Ha-psalim (Sculpture Garden) A beautiful setting for twenty two bronze sculptures donated to the city by the sculptress Ursula Malbin that are set in a garden overlooking Haifa bay and the Galilee landscape. Technion, Israel Institute of Technology The Technion is located in the Neve Sha'anan neighborhood. This institution for higher technological studies is famous worldwide for its scientific achievements. The Coler Visitors Center screens a film on the Technion's history. University of Haifa Haifa University is situated on one of the Carmel Mountain peaks. It is outstanding for its modern planning and three graduate buildings. For spectacular views of Haifa and the Bay area, visit the lookout point in the Eshkol Tower, the University's main building. The University also houses an art gallery with works displayed by artists, victims of the holocaust. A tour of the site includes the Visitors Center where a film is shown and a call at the Reuben and Edith Hecht Archaeological Museum. Wadi Nisnas Wadi Nisnas, with its colorful market and bustling streets is an authentic Middle Eastern neighborhood. The Wadi is also the heart of the “holiday of holidays” festival, an annual winter celebration of collaboration between the Christian, Muslim and Jewish religions.

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