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Israel Hotels and travel guide – Inisrael.com

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Your direct travel guide, where you can find special Israel Hotels deals, a great selection othe leading hotels in Israel big or small, car renals and other travel services as well as up to date information and rich content about Israel.

Jerusalem

La Regence Restaurant at the King David Hotel

About La Regence - at the King David hotel Jerusalem At Le Regence Restaurant, the finest ingredients, innovative cooking methods, and precision execution based on classical cooking combine to create a contemporary, fine, surprising, and kosher Israeli cuisine. The kitchen is both avant-garde and simple; rooted in his country, but addressing an international audience at the same time. Using flavors, textures, temperatures, colors, shapes, and aromas, the dishes create an exciting sensation that pleases all senses. We are looking forward to welcoming you to Le Regence and giving you a special, pleasant, and exciting experience. It was a fun and unforgettable culinary experience. Our kitchen In Le Regence Restaurant, Israeli cuisine is refined and contemporary. At the same time avant-garde and simple, it addresses an international audience while being rooted in its country. A sensory experience involving flavors, textures, temperatures, colors, shapes, and aromas stimulates all five senses at once. Please let us know when you are available so we can give you a special, pleasant and exciting experience at Le Regence. Culinary experience that is fun and unforgettable. Local, seasonal, and fresh products are at the forefront of the chef's menu. The foundation of a beautifully executed virtuoso work of art is the artist's passion, imagination and creativity, as well as his endless curiosity and constant search for knowledge. Le Regence Restaurant invites you into a magical and enchanting world. Address: King David St 23, Jerusalem Phone: 02-620-8888

Chakra restaurant Jerusalem - Mediterranean fusion style

Non-kosher restaurant bar with a good vibe, beautiful people, and good food, accurate execution, and the service is friendly. Among the classic dishes offered on the Mediterranean menu are, jumbo shrimp, cheeseburgers, and more. Chakra Restaurant has been operating in Jerusalem since 2000 and is an anchor for the city's food and nightlife culture. Located near the Independence Garden in the heart of Jerusalem, this restaurant offers a meticulous service, modern cuisine, a lively and diverse bar, and a pastoral atmosphere. With a daily changing menu of fresh goods, there is a rich and varied menu in a Mediterranean fusion style that includes fish dishes, seafood, meats, and a special menu. Chakra restaurant guests can enjoy the fresh and warm air in the garden square in the summer evenings, as well as the view of the city garden. Address: 41 King George Street, Jerusalem Phone: 02-625-2733

A new Isrotel hotel in Jerusalem will open in 2024

A new Isrotel hotel in Jerusalem will open in 2024 at Zion Square, Jerusalem and will offer 250 rooms! The new hotel that the Isrotel chain is building in Zion Square in Jerusalem will be built on the basis of two buildings for preservation, on which an addition of four new floors will be built. The buildings will be connected by an overhead bridge, the first of its kind in the city. The bridge, which has a glass floor, will be used as a dining area and lobby and will allow a panoramic view towards Zion Square, the pedestrian street and Jaffa Street. The hotel is in the urban center of Jerusalem, close to the light rail and the centers of history, culture and lively entertainment. The hotel has a swimming pool on the roof, a conference hall and meeting rooms, restaurants and an adjacent parking lot. There is no doubt that there is something new in Jerusalem, the city is getting a boost in the field of transportation with a fast train from Tel Aviv and many infrastructures that have been improved and also new hotels that will open soon. There is something to look forward to.

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Tel Aviv

The Steinhardt Museum of Natural History

From a scientific collection of five and a half million items, the museum displays Israel's national natural treasures. Thousands of items are displayed in the museum's exhibitions that tell the story of our natural world, which have been collected over the years. Tel Aviv University's Steinhardt Museum of Nature is committed to inspiring the acquisition of knowledge, understanding and strengthening our connection to nature, and our place within it - for the benefit of future generations. Through creating a unique closeness and interaction with nature that cannot be experienced elsewhere, the museum reveals scientific knowledge (of the research taking place there) and unique perspectives in an experiential, multisensory and fun way. Address: Klausner St 12, Tel Aviv-Yafo

Har Sinai alley and the Great Synagogue

There are a number of popular nighttime eateries in the Har Sinai alley that wraps around the Great Synagogue of Tel Aviv. There is great food and a cool place to hang out in the evening. There is a Shishko Resto-Bar where you can dine. A Balkan influence can be found in its cuisine. You can also find tasty dishes at the other spots - Eyal Shani's Port Said restaurant is located near the Great Synagogue with a variety of dishes offered at discounted prices with a focus on quality ingredients, while Thailandit offers relaxed entertainment, the food remains spicy, challenging in a good way, and faithful to the original. You can walk towards the Harbaa Street, Shenkin Street, Rothchild Boulevard from Allenby, which is on the other side of the synagogue...

Brut wine bar, Tel Aviv

If you're looking for a truly unique dining experience, look no further than Brut. This restaurant's cuisine is inspired by the classic French and Italian kitchens, but with a Middle Eastern twist. You'll find ingredients like lamb and yogurt from Nazareth, fruit and vegetables from Hebron, and spices from Tel Aviv's Levinsky Market. The menu features both classic dishes and seasonal creations, often invented the same day they're served. And the wine list is a love letter to all things French and Italian, with a focus on small-scale producers and Israeli wineries. Brut is an ongoing celebration of local terroir, and you won't find anything else quite like it. Brut is small, deeply personal wine bistro in Tel Aviv, founded by yair yosefi and omer ben gal. Brut's cuisine is inspired by Yair and Omer's shared love of the classic French and Italian kitchens, while remaining steadfastly rooted in local Middle Eastern tradition. The ingredients used in Brut are sourced from the Levant, including lamb and yogurt from Nazareth, fruit and vegetables from Hebron, and spices from Tel Aviv's Levinsky Market. There is a stable of classic dishes as well as an ever-changing selection of seasonal dishes, often created the very same day. In a similar way, Brut's extensive wine list is a love letter to all things French and Italian while also highlighting Israel's emerging winemakers. They also work with Israeli wineries on blends that are grown and bottled exclusively for Brut, which are imported from small-scale producers in Bourgogne and Piedmont. Local terroir is celebrated and examined in Brut. Along with the physical land and its raw materials, this also includes the culture, communities, and yes, even conflicts that have influenced the land's character." +972-35102923 ​ ADDRESS: NAHALAT BINYAMIN 36 TEL AVIV, ISRAEL HOURS: TUESDAY - FRIDAY 7 PM – 12 AM

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Eilat

The Red Sea Jazz Festival

This year, the Red Sea Jazz Festival returns to the wonderful port of Eilat - the festival's classic location under the stars - with performances and original productions by some of the best leading artists today. The International Jazz Festival is back after two years of great anticipation! Red Sea Jazz Festival - returns to Eilat port! with dozens of artists from Israel and the world November 12 – 10, Eilat port Maestro Yossi Payne, the music man and artistic director of the festival, curated and connected artists from here and there for three days with 18 (!) performances that you won't want to miss, and so that you don't miss a single show - this year you can purchase a PASS and enjoy all the shows. Along with well-known and beloved names that are always wonderful to meet again at the festival, this year you will meet quite a few young and up-and-coming artists who preserve and refresh the Israeli and global jazz scene. In the 36th edition of the festival, we are proud to announce the opening show of the Israeli super-group THIRD WORLD LOVE, in a one-time reunion show exclusive to the festival. After almost a decade of absence from the stage - Yonatan Avishai, Avishai Cohen, Omer Avital and Daniel Friedman return to play together in the port of Eilat. Another artist who will land and come straight to the festival is Jacob Collier from London who comes to us in his prime and in the middle of a world tour with 4 albums and 5 Grammy Awards. Grammy winner (3 to be exact) this time from the USA, Corey Henry will come up and perform with the famous keyboards, in a trio show that combines jazz with soul. In an original production for the festival, Gidi Gov will host Alon Olarchik, with non-standard performances of the hits we all love. And close the festival with a final show conceived by Maestro Fine combining musicians from all his favorite genres - a super group that will form for the first time on the festival stage. Conducted by Neta Barzilai, Nono, Eko and Cohen will be guests for a cross-genre celebration of jazz with hip-hop and spoken word.

The Ice mall Eilat with iceskating arena

The Ice mall is among the newest malls in Israel and the bigger one in Eilat. The mall is wide and pleasant to walk around. We were in one of the peak weeks of the season of tourism in Eilat - Passover holiday, and it was pleasant and fun to be in. In the mall you can find major chains and stores and shopping is VAT free. The highlight of the mall - a huge ice skating arena. The mall is highly recommended for families and children. The mall offers countless attractions for children and adults.

The Dolphin Reef Eilat

The Beach The dolphin reef beach is a private beach, offering a diversity of services, such as bathrooms and showers, restaurant, diving courses, swimming and diving with dolphins and a lot more. The beach itself is not very big, but the golden sand compensate you for the little round stones covering the other Eilatian beaches. As soon as you enter the beach, you see the defined area, in which the dolphins are swimming. For the time being, there are ten dolphins, some of them were brought from the Caspian Sea in Russia, and some of them were born in Eilat, and are Israeli citizens…. The uniqueness of the place is the fact that there was not and there isn’t an attempt to domesticate the dolphins. That defined area in which they are living is not closed, and allows the dolphins free entrance and exit. As a matter of fact, the dolphins are staying there out of their own free will. The dolphins frequently swim to the open sea, for the simple fact that they have to supply themselves with food. The “Dolphin-reef “ crew does not supply them with food, and does not interfere with their private life. Aside from that, those dolphin has a good taste of their own…they too - same as we - loves the Red Sea, with all of its beautiful coral reefs and spectacular undersea creatures. Preparing to swim After struggling with myself, I chose to swim with the dolphins, rather than diving with them. Sarit, the instructor, gave me a short brief, focusing on the interaction between those diverse mammals and us. There are some rules such as not chasing the dolphins, not touching sensitive areas like the eyes, the blowhole on their head and their genitalia (as if we wanted to do that…). We also got an explanation regarding the personal equipment, which includes snorkel, diving-mask, flippers and diving suit. If you are anxious to commemorate the occasion, you can rent an under-water camera, or pay to professional photographer to come along with you, for video shooting or stills. No one promised us that we could get real close. After all, that depends on the dolphins themselves. We were a little disappointed, but our hopes increased while remembering that half an hour of swimming is a lot of time. After a short demo practice, outside the defined area, we moved into it (“we” means me, five other visitors and, of course, Sarit). In the water with the dolphins What can I tell you…from the first moment you can sense the presence of that amazing creature, by hearing the unique sounds that it can produce. It is unbelievable! You can Swimming and Diving with dolphins in Eilatnot see them yet, but you sure can hear them. We all tried to make the first eye contact, but came out with nothing. I raised my head out of the water, and caught a glimpse of back-flippers about 50 meters from me. After a few minutes I nearly had a cocktail of salty sea water, when my mouth almost opened wide because of a huge dolphin, swimming in superb, passing along my swimming buddy, a tourist from the Netherlands, who actually was able to touch it. I saw the dolphin moving on into the deep water, and I was so envious of my friend at that time, because I was afraid that this time I wouldn’t share his experience. The first encounter But, after a few minutes of swimming here and forth, came, just out of the blue, an amazing dolphin, named Bunchy, according to Sarit. Bunchy was a young dolphin, which explains the fact that he still doesn’t get bored of meeting groups of enthusiastic people such as we were. The wild dive Bunchy stayed with us for about 15 seconds more, and during this time he surely felt like the most beloved dolphin in the world. We touched him, caressed him and played with him. It took us a while to realize that we are swimming with a dolphin (!), but soon it seemed like the most natural thing to do. Bunchy surrounded us and examined us above and under the water… it was really hard to say who enjoyed this meeting more…Bunchy or us… Conclusions I can hardly explain the feeling touching his smooth skin, and the feeling I got out of a 10cm distance between my head and Bunchy’s. You just have to be there in order to understand. Swimming with dolphins was something I dreamt about since I was a little boy. I guess it was under the influence and impression of books that had been read to me, or because the mythological and unforgettable TV show - “Flipper”. Out of that short experience I’ve had in the Dolphin Reef, I can say that dolphins are the most amazing mammals. You can sense, in every moment, their high intelligence (no doubt, much more then a few people I happened to have met in my life). All farewells are sad, especially if that farewell is from the first dolphin you have ever met, but you can find some comfort knowing you can always do that again, if you are in Eilat, and have about two hours and some bucks (about 200NIS) to spend.

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Deadsea

A new Isrotel luxury hotel in the Dead Sea in 2023

A new Isrotel luxury hotel in the Dead Sea in 2023 is set to open 2023 with 47 luxury suites. A hotel that redefines vacation on the unique beaches of the lowest place in the world. The hotel has luxury suites, some of which go directly to the infinity pool in front of the sea, restaurants and a large spa complex, which will offer a rich menu of massages and treatments. The hotel will join the Isrotel luxury hotel group.

The Dead Sea Mall

The "Dead Sea Mall" opened for the first time in the Dead Sea, one of the ten wonders of the world. The mall is a tourist attraction and provides an answer to a decades-old shortage. In the new shopping mall, located on a private and amazing beach, there are dozens of stores offering international brands in a variety of fields - clothing, footwear, luxury jewelry, special concept stores and more - as well as cafes and restaurants that provide tourists with additional entertainment places in the hotel area. The mall covers an area of about 15,000 square meters over two floors, and is one of the most beautiful seen in the country. The Dead Sea Mall caters to the Dead Sea area, which is the most visited area in Israel. There is currently no answer for a shopping and entertainment center in this area, and the mall offers an extraordinary tourist experience. The mall is located in the heart of the hotel area in Ein Bokek on the Dead Sea, and is close to the seashore. "The Dead Sea Mall is one of the most original and prestigious commercial projects ever established in Israel. In addition to the extraordinary architecture that corresponds with the environment of the Dead Sea, which has been declared one of the eight wonders of the world, a particularly prestigious mix of stores has been chosen that includes the most well-known and leading chains in the world in order to be able to serve the public in the best possible way."

Masada - world heritage site a tourist destination by the Dead Sea

Masada is the most visited site of all the archaeological sites in Israel and one of its main tourist attractions. It contains ancient palaces and fortifications located on top of an isolated rock plateau in a stunning desert site overlooking the Dead Sea. And it holds a great historical value, too. Masada (meaning 'fortress' in Hebrew) became known for its attributed mythic significance in the First Jewish-Roman War (also known as the Great Jewish Revolt). In the first century A.D. nearly a thousand Jewish rebels who believed in zero-tolerance toward the Roman rule took over the fortress and were surrounded by the Roman army, which left behind the most complete siege works in the world. When defeat appeared imminent, the rebels chose to commit suicide instead of giving in and spending the rest of their lives as slaves. This made Mesada a symbol of the human spirit’s yearning for freedom. The Israel Nature and Parks Protection Authority had expertly restored the ruins of Masada, so visitors can almost re-live the last days of this heroic story's main characters. The latest attraction is the remarkable new museum, with nine dramatically lit rooms displaying some precious finds alongside life-size statues. In the Masada museum, visitors can easily picture the lives and deaths of these Jewish fugitives, who refused to surrender. Beyond the mythic importance of this site, you will find the Dead Sea and desert mountains views absolutely stupendous. The cliffs on the east edge of this Dead Sea site are about 1,300 feet high and the cliffs on the west are about 300 feet high. The fortress can be reached from two directions today - either from the Dead Sea in the east, via the original and steep "snake path", or from the west on a path built from the old Roman ramp, offering an easier climb or a cable car. Masada is a world heritage site and a very popular tourist destination. It is definitely one of your must-see sites while visiting the holy land. Visitors can stay at many of the hotels located at the Dead sea Ein Bokek area, Ein Gedi, and Kalia.

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Sea of Galilee

The Scots Hotel Tiberias story

The story about the Scots Hotel St. Andrew's -a famous hotel in Tiberias The Scots Hotel St. Andrew's is a hotel in Tiberias, Israel that is owned and managed by the Church of Scotland. The hotel was founded in 1885 by David Watt Torrance, a 23 year old surgeon from Airdrie, Scotland, in order to set up the Scottish "Mission of the Jews" in the Holy Land. The hotel is open to all regardless of race, creed, class or color. The David Building was a hospital that was opened on 1st January 1894. Present at the opening ceremony were the local Chief Rabbi, the Governor, the Muslim Mufti, the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox priests, the local Chief Judge and many others from the local communities. The song a hymn in Arabic and a prayer was said. The governor and Mrs. Torrance performed the opening ceremony. initially, the hospital offered general care, and later became a maternity Hospital. in 1959, with the opening of a new state-run hospital it was no longer needed. it was closed down and re-opened two years later as a hospice for pilgrims, which later developed into a guest house. The policy of welcoming everybody regardless of race, creed or color initiated by Torrance is still in force. Local people have stayed and eaten breakfast in the room in which they first sow the light of day when it was the delivery room. in the summer, Torrance would travel amongst the nomadic peoples and in the cooler months they would travel to Tiberias. On one occasion, a huge Bedouin warrior was seen crawling on his hands and knees up the stairs to the wards because he had never seen a two-story buildings before The port of the upstairs lounge area was once an operating theatre with huge windows providing good light. The Ceilidh Bar and other rooms either side of it at the head of the stairs were the wards, female on the left, male on the right, Muslim in the middle. There were eight beds in each ward and six cots distributed as required. Torrance held weekly services in Arabic and English. They were received sometimes with silence, sometimes with abuse and sometimes with response and debate. Torrance believed however, that real communication of the Gospel came in the unconditional acceptance of the sick. From the roof terrace, one can see the mixed nature of old Tiberias with the Great Mosque, St.Peter's Roman Catholic Church and several Synagogues. The modern high-rise hotels show that Tiberias has become a town built on tourism. Rev. Andrew Bonar who was in the original exploratory team of 1839 predicted, "Tiberias will one day become one of the most important winter resorts in the world". Tiberias now has over 6000 hotel beds with more being added. The Scots Hotel contributes 140 beds to the total, and through the ethos of the place provides Christian hospitality to all people regardless of race. The old church building is a place of worship that has been the central focus of the spiritual life of the mission since about 1930. The building was originally a school, but was turned into a church sanctuary in the 1890s. The church is named after St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland. David Torrance was a doctor who moved to Tiberias to help the people there. He was very successful and helped a lot of people, even though it was difficult. He had a lot of children, some of whom became doctors too. David Torrance was a missionary who served in the Tiberias Mission. He was ordained a missionary minister by Glasgow Presbytery in 1895. His main tasks were in educational work, both formal and religious. John Soutar was also a missionary who served in the Tiberias Mission. He is buried in the same graveyard as David Torrance. The Beach Tower is part of the old city wall that was first laid on this site by the Crusaders. Donna Gracia, a Portuguese Jew, rebuilt the walls with the help of her nephew. In the 18th century, the Bedouin leader Daher Al Omar rebuilt the walls again. Part of the original Roman city wall can still be seen over by the hot springs. By the time Dr. Torrance arrived, the city was squashed into the 34 acres that the Crusaders had walled in after the earthquake of 1034. The city was under Turkish control and administered by a local Arab Governor. Because of this structure, the locals thought that Torrance would never be allowed to own land or build a hospital. The Turkish authorities were suspicious of anything that missionaries did. Torrance obtained all the land he wanted by means of regular conversations with the owner who was a Mufti, a local Muslim leader. Torrance never expressed an interest in the land but was finally offered it for 60 British Pounds. He immediately built two residences, one for the minister in 1891 and one for himself a year later. For a hospital building, a special deed of permission (a firman) was needed. The book is about a doctor named Torrance who goes to Constantinople to help people. He is able to do this because he is a very determined person and because he has the support of the local officials. He is seen as a very compassionate person and is one of the first healers to work in that area in a long time. He attributes his skills to his faith in Christ. The Manse is a house that was built in 1890. It is a big house with many rooms. It became a hospital for women and children in 1921. A Turkish man bought the land for the hospital, but he decided it was too hot in Tiberias so he sold it cheaply to Torrance. The Present It is unthinkable that any church would voluntarily abandon work on the shore of the Lake that saw so much of Jesus' ministry. The potential for the site to be used for the furtherance of the Kingdom is so huge that the response needed to be one of great vision. in 1999 the General Assembly of the church of Scotland overwhelmingly caught the vision. We are now at the beginning of fulfilling that vision. By erecting a new building and refurbishing and upgrading the existing ones, we are now in a position to offer Christian hospitality to all - pilgrims from overseas and groups and individuals from Israel who seek rest and opportunity for reflection in conditions of unsurpassed comfort and service. The gardens have been landscaped and replanted with a variety of flowers and trees. The views from almost everywhere on the premises are wonderful, whether they be of the Lake and the Golan Heights beyond (on clear winter days even snow covered Mount Hermon looking like a long low cloud is visible) or of Bereniki and the Swiss Forest above the town. Situated as it is, on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, the Scots Hotel is ideally positioned for exploration of the north of Israel whether it be holy sites associated with the birth of Christianity, ancient sites that speak of the history of this land and region or the wonders of creation in the spring flowers and migrating birds. The Church of Scotland is a branch of Christianity that started in Scotland. It is also known as "The Kirk" and people in it are called Presbyterians. The Church of Scotland believe in democracy and that everyone is equal in the eyes of God.

Tzemach beach Sea of Galilee

The renewed Tzemach beach Sea of Galilee At the Tzemach junction in front of a mall in front of the Sea of Galilee You will find the Tzemach beach Sea of Galilee - a quiet beach with wide lawns, shades and toilets. Admission to the beach is free and is open for your enjoyment all days of the week. Fun bathing and a pleasant pastime. Tzemach beach is a quiet beaches, where music alcohol are forbidden. Inspectors will work with the assistance of the Kinneret Environmental Guard Unit and the teams on the beaches, to enforce and maintain public order. This is in addition to the security guards.

Kinar Galilee Hotel

Kinar Galilee Hotel is a spacious hotel complex on the shores of the Sea of ​​Galilee, offering the best holiday experience in the north. At the hotel you will find a variety of room types: located in the main building and luxurious garden rooms scattered among the lawns. This way, you can choose exactly the right room for your vacation on the Sea of ​​Galilee. The pool and sports facilities: Inside the Kinar Galiliee complex and near the Kinar beach, our pool operates: a semi-Olympic seasonal pool, separate, active during the summer season. The pool is open to hotel guests only and has playground facilities for toddlers and next to it are a tennis court, basketball court, ping pong table and lawns. The quiet spaces: For a vacation with the kids or for a couple's vacation - at Kinar Galilee you will find your peace and your corners. The main building provides you with a lobby, restaurants, a synagogue and halls. At the hotel you will find seating areas and lawn. By the way, you may not want to leave the pampering rooms so quickly. The Sea of the Galilee Beach: Kinneret Beach is the largest separate beach in Kinneret. The beach is declared and provides seasonal rescue services and ancillary services such as changing rooms and restrooms. Like the other shores of the Sea of ​​Galilee, the beach is managed and maintained by the Sea of ​​Galilee Administration. In addition to bathing, swimming and observing the beauty of the flora and fauna of the Sea of ​​Galilee, we also recommend walking the "Around the Sea of ​​Galilee" route, whose route passes near the beach and allows a tour on foot or by bicycle. You can order a variety of water sports activities of different types: fishing on a boat, kayaking, bananas and a variety of activities on the beaches close to the Sea of ​​Galilee. Adjacent to Kinar Beach is Duga Beach - a declared beach with mixed bathing.

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Netanya

Manao Beach, Neurim, Hefer Valley

The Manao Neurim beach, recently upgraded and now offers sports training complex with variety of gyms and workshops, as well as a Puccioli lot (beach volleyball -like game). The renewed beach restaurant and the coffee satnd on the cliff. The entire coastal space was built using natural resources, in the design that blends with the sea, according to ecological values. the Manao Nurim beach is a beatiful mediteranian beach with yellow soft sand and amazing water for bathing and surfing. MANA Restaurant is a great dining spot that offers Israeli dishes that may include Cabbage Salad, Different Fish, Tabula, Zukini Salad, Hamburgers, drinks and deserts.

The Portuguese diner, Bitan Aharon

When you cross Israel from south to north or visiting the Sharon area (Netanya and it's vicinity), you can stop and satisfy your hunger at the Portugese. you are invited to enjoy a delicious smoked meat meal, amazing sandwiches, dreamy wings, legendary chicken and many other dishes for the whole family at prices that suit every family. The Portuguese. Bitan Aharon. 09-9531549 Opening Hours: Sunday-Thursday between 11:30 and 22:00 Friday between 11:00 and 16:00 Saturday is closed

Herzl's Burika, Netanya Market - Shuk

Burika or Burik, is one a fastfood falfel competitor dish of Tunisian and Tripoli expats. This small stand has existed for more than 60 years and today is managed by Eli, the third generation, who prepares a wonderful and crackling burika "exactly according to the family's traditional recipe". For many people in Brick, or Burika, depending on who you ask, it's a matter of nostalgia: Brick stands were almost as common as falafel stands in the 70s and 80s. Today, if you want to buy a brik hot from the fryer, you can find it mainly in the Ada strongholds in Yehud, Netanya and the Carmel Market. The brik dough is unique in the world of doughs: both thin, flexible and really, really comfortable to work with. Its preparation is a craft in which the number of practitioners is decreasing, and is mainly reserved for experienced Tunisian cooks, who know the techniques and tricks for precisely rolling out the delicate dough. For home preparation, we borrow the cigar leaves from the Moroccan kitchen - they are also flexible, thin and behave excellently in frying. You can find them in the frozen dough section of the supermarket, next to the Malawach. Eli fills the thin burik sheet, made on site, with egg and potatoes and deep-fries everything together. If all this goodness is not enough padding for you, he will put the fried burek in a pita for you to protect your clothes from the runny egg yolk. You can add spicy, tahini, salad and chershi (pumpkin salad) to this perfect dish, and most importantly - you can buy Burik leaves for home. Shoham 13 Netanya

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Golan Heights

Golan - Fast Facts

Area........................................1,158 sq km Border length with Syria........80 km Highest peak..........................2,224 meter above sea level Villages...................................36 Jewish.....................................32 Druze villages.........................4 Main town................................Katzrin. (the only town) Jewish population .................16,500 Druze population....................17,000 Nature reserve........................246 sq km Cultivated area.......................80 sq km Grazing lands..........................460 sq km Guest rooms...........................1,100 Cattle.......................................19,950 head Sheep......................................5,000 https://www.inisrael.com/golan/fastfacts.htm

A Brief History of the Golan

The Golan's first human inhabitants arrived on the plateau some half a million years ago, probably having migrated from Africa along the Syrian-African rift. These early people of the Golan hunted the animals that lived in the vast swamplands and lakes along the rift. In the Late Stone Age, as man began perfecting his ability to fashion tools. groups of people settled In the areas of the Golan that were rich in flint- the raw material fer tools. The dawn of history on the Golan dates back about 8,000 years, to the Chalcolithic period. For 3,000 years of that epoch, a distinct culture of graziers and farmersInscribed its mark on the plateau and its cliff edges. The remains of grain storage facilities, seeds, olive pits, and lentils in its settlements attest to man's first major revolution-the development of agriculture. With it Came manent communities. houses, villages, towns, and urban organization. But the farmers and graziers of the Golan were overcome, about 5,000 years ago, by a wave of nomads that overran the Golan. Their legacy is comprised of hundreds of table like graves dotting the open spaces of the Golan, several massively fortified corrpounds erected on the most invulnerable points of the Golan's steep mountain ridges, and a few enigmas like the Rujum-el-Hiri and compound, a complex of huge circular concentric stone fences with openings at certain points and stone markers at others. The Rujum-el-Hiri and other "Phantom circles" like it have been identified as everything from astronomical observation platforms to religious edifices and alien contact Points. Whatever they were, those who constructed them, the denizens of the Golan in the Bronze Age. vanished about 3,200 yeas ago. Once the new realms of the area were founded, the Israelite kingdom to the west and the various Aramaean kingdoms to the east, the Golan served as a buffer zone between these warring rivals. Sparsely populated, the plateau was the site of repeated battles between the Israelites and their adversaries. It was during this period that one of the cities of refuge in the territory of the people of Israel was established on the Golan-and called Golan. When the eastern Mediterranean and adjacent inland areas were unified as part of the empire of Alexander the Great, the Golan was finally settled in earnest. From the fourth century BCE, numerous villages with small fortified structures next to them were erected all over the Golan. By the time Alexander's heirs were celebrating their inheritance, large towns were coming into being, and the subsequent Jewish commonwealth of the maccabees had reason to consider the Golan a worthy political objective, The large Jewish population of the area, together with the Jewish population of the cities east of the Jordan, made the Golan a prime target of annexation to the Jewish state. Meanwhile, in the environs of Mount Hermon and the northern Golan, a nomadic tribe of Arabs known as the Itureans was developing a unique mountain culture. When the Romans conquered the area, putting an end to the feuding remnants of Alexander's empire and the Jewish commonwealth, settlement and construction on the Golan boomed. Cities like Banias (Caesarea Philippi), Gamla, Hippos, Gadara, Seleucia, and Sogane became centers of GrecoRoman culture. By the time of Jesus, the Jews of the Golan were a significant fome in the area of his ministry in the Galilee. Jesus fled Herod Antipas, ruler of the Galilee, to the Golan. Here in the Jewish villages around Caesarea Pfiilippi and the southern Golan he spent his last days before making his fateful final journey to Jerusalem. The widespread messianic fervor of the first century, animosity between Jews and Gentiles, and the hardships of Roman taxation together with economic shifts finally ignited into the Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans. Gamla, Seleucia, and Sogane fortified themselves against the Romans. At Gamla the defenders put up a heroic fight against the besieging Roman legions, but when the lack of a cohesive Jewish force brought about their inevitable defeat, the city's inhabitants climbed to the rock spur at the summit of their town and flung them selves down, en masse, into the ravine below. Gamla was a hotbed of the Jewish resistance movement: its defenders had resolved that they could not live with enslavement to the Romans. When the Roman Empire became Byzantine, and the state religion Christianity, the Golan, together with the rest of the eastern Mediterranean, flourished. New towns and villages, churches and synagogues, were built, decorated, and then redecorated as the times and the styles changed. It was a time of prosperity for all. In 636 the Arab armies of the new religion of Islam defeated the Byzantine frontier troops. After the conquest, the boundaries between nomad and settler dissolved as the desert once again overran the sown land. In 636, the Arabs vanquished the Byzantine army at the critical battle of Yarmuk at Yakuza in the southern Golan, and the entire region-all the way to northern Syria-fell into Muslim hands. Gradually, in the absence of the unifying hand of the Byzantine empire, the local economy disintegrated. The center of the Muslim world gravitated over time to Egypt, Damascus, and then Baghdad, abandoning the areas in between to neglect. The Golan once again became the pasture lands of nomads and the arena of marauding Bedouin tribes. When the Crusaders conquered the Land of Israel, the Golan became the border territory between them and the Muslim emirate of Damascus, The area soon deteriorated into a no-man's-land, Crusader and Muslim raiding expeditions attacking its Bedouins and farmers at random. Both Muslims and Crusaders erected fortified positions, castles, and towns along the Golan, which Passed with every change of fortune from one side to the other, Banias, located on a strategic leg of the road from Tyre to Damascus, was considered the key to the Holy Land by the Crusaders. Above it, the immense Nimrod's Fortress became theheadquarters of the secretive sect of the Hashishiya, members of which were for hire to carry out the political murders of Crusader and Muslim leaders. The feared sect's legacy to the West is the word "assassin." Once the Crusaders were vanquished, the Golan again became a backwater; this time of the Mameluke empire. New construction was confined to a few khans (caravansaries) built along the dusty roads connecting Damascus to Egypt or leading to the port of Acre. With the fall of the Mameluke empire to the Ottomans in 1516, the Golan was rendered even more remote from the centers of power. During this time, its sparse population was mainly Bedouin. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Druze from Lebanon and Syria and Alawites from Lebanon began to penetrate the plateau, and permanent settlements reemerged in the nineteenth century when security conditions in the area began to improve, Towards the end of the nineteenth century, Circassians, refugees from Bosnia and the surrounding lands who were evicted by the Christian forces, were settled in the Golan by the Ottoman authorities. Arabs from North Africa also attempted to settle in the area together with Jews from the Galilee, who built a few Jewish agricultural villages. With the fall of the Ottoman empire after the First World War and the Sykes-Picot Treaty, the Golan was divided between the British and the French, the formerapportioned a mandate over the Land of Israel (then-British Palestine, which included Jordan) and the latter allocated Syria and Lebanon as their piece of the Middle East pie. The borders between the British and French mandates on the Golan that were drawn up in the twenties left a number of areas vaguely undecided. For the Bedouin tribes whose daily lives straddled the new border and whose goats grazed indifferently on both sides, the exact border was a moot point. The creation of Syria in 1946 signaled the end of the French mandate, and when the British finally left Palestine in 1948, the Syrians invaded the entire Golan. After an unsuccessful attempt in conjunction with six other Arab states to destroy Israel at the moment of its inception, the Syrians transformed the Golan into a fortified border area-a military zone from which to launch a second round of offensives against Israel complete with heavy fortifications, bunkers, and military camps, Towns and villages for the families of military personnel were also erected. Periodically, the Syrians, sitting in their fortified positions above the Israeli settlements in the Hula and Jordan valleys, shelled the Israeli villages below. In 1965 the Syrians attempted to divert the sources of the Jordan River through the Golan so that they would not flow into Israeli territory. Artillery skirmishes and military attacks broke out time and again between the Israelis and the Syrians. In 1967, Syria, Egypt and Jordan launched another attack on Israel. After a six day battle, the Arab armies were beaten back by the Israelis, who also conquered the staging areas of their attackers. Among them was the Golan. The Syrian villagers of the Golan fled with their retreating army and only the villagers of the four Druze villages on Mount Hermon remained in their homes. After resolving never to negotiate with Israel and declaring the resolution to an international audience, the Arabs try to annihilate Israel Israel once again in 1973, but are routed This time, the Israelis, advanced eastwards to take areas of Syria east of the Golan. Following their losses, and in view of the fact that Israeli forces were now within artillery range from Damascus, the Syrians were compelled to negotiate a disengagement agreement with Israel via American mediation. following the agreement, the Israeli army retreated from the areas conquered In 1973 and additional areas of the Golan. Military forces on both sides were regulated, leaving a minimal number of troops and tanks, and a UN observer force set in place Since then, for the last quarter century, the Golan has been at peace. https://www.inisrael.com/golan/history.htm

Flora and Fauna

The Golan, synonymous in the Bible (along with the Bashan) with a heavily wooded area, was still covered with dense woods and forests in the recent past. Unfortunately, those forests have been cleared for agriculture and grazing over the last few generations, but in the northern part of the Golan and in copses and thickets in the south, the endemic trees of the region can still be seen. The oak and terebinth forests of the Golan give rise to an impressive landscape, the numerous deciduous trees lending the terrain a European feel in the winter. In the late winter and spring, the ground between the trees is covered with blossoms from the rarest of orchids to anemones, tulips, and a patchwork of other wildflowers, some of Them unique to the Golan. On the upper slopes of the Hermon range, alpine meadows and vegetation can be found. There the flowers bloom in early summer, in contrast to the winter florescence in the rest of Israel, making the Hermon a unique destination for nature lovers. The wildlife of the Golan is the most varied in Israel. The human population on the Golan is sparse, the region has relatively large open areas, and significant segments of it have been declared nature reserves. The Golan is a meeting place for fauna that migrates north along the Syrian-African rift from Africa and the desert areas, fauna that makes its way westwards across the steppes of Asia, and European fauna that arrives from the north. Fifteen species of fish swim in the rivers and ponds of the Golan, while seven species of amphibians and thirty-five different kinds of reptiles (only one of them poisonous!) populate their banks. Millions of birds fly over the Golan during their biannual migration from Europe to Africa and back: one hundred vulture couples nest in the Gamla Nature Reserve, together with eagles and other raptors. The Golan is home to thousands of gazelles, rock rabbits, hyenas, wild boars, foxes, and even a rare subspecies of wolf unique to the Golan. They cohabit with badgers, jackals, wildcats, and an extremely uncommon leopard or two. Seventy years ago Mount Hermon was still home to the Asian brown bear, but none have been sighted for three generations now. https://www.inisrael.com/golan/flora.htm

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Haifa

Ben-Gurion Boulevard Haifa

German Colony is a historic, happening neighborhood where the Baháʼí World Center and its leafy terraces attract 1 million pilgrims a year. Ben-Gurion Boulevard is lined with hotels, cafes, and restaurants, some in renovated Templer buildings. Located near the harbor, Haifa City Museum displays exhibits in an 1890s building. There are many bars in the colony, making it a popular nightlife destination. There are restaurants, cafes, and boutique hotels on both sides of this boulevard, which starts in a small but beautiful shopping center and leads up to the Bahai Garden.

The National Maritime Museum Haifa

The National Maritime Museum - was established in 1953, from the private collection of the late Aryeh Ben-Eli, who was the founder and first director of the museum. In 1972, the building was inaugurated at 198 Allenby Street, where it is still today. The museum presents spectacular exhibitions of ships from different periods, the pirate exhibition presented in the museum as part of the permanent exhibition is an experiential exhibition and the only one of its kind in Israel. In addition, the museum displays rare finds that survived from ancient times, underwater archaeology, Greco-Roman coins, maritime mythology and more. The museum is located at the southern entrance to Haifa and attracts thousands of visitors a year. The exhibition invites visitors to a space full of love for the sea and connects them directly with the museum's new story. It features a display of bottled ships and models of ships from around the world created by sailors as part of the unique leisure culture that has evolved aboard ships sailing in the distance. Address: Derech Allenby 198, Haifa Image by: Zvi Roger

Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art

The Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art was founded in 1959. You can learn about Japanese culture and art through the museum's traditional and contemporary art exhibitions. The museum houses a wide collection of art and craft objects, including swords, ceramics, traditional textiles, and more, most of which were donated by Felix Tikotin. Japanese art is the only museum of its kind in the Middle East. Aside from being located near the avenue of hotels, the educational zoo, and other attractions, the museum is located in the center of Carmel, an entertainment and tourism area. Address: 89 Hanasi St., Haifa.

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Tiberias

The Scots Hotel Tiberias story

The story about the Scots Hotel St. Andrew's -a famous hotel in Tiberias The Scots Hotel St. Andrew's is a hotel in Tiberias, Israel that is owned and managed by the Church of Scotland. The hotel was founded in 1885 by David Watt Torrance, a 23 year old surgeon from Airdrie, Scotland, in order to set up the Scottish "Mission of the Jews" in the Holy Land. The hotel is open to all regardless of race, creed, class or color. The David Building was a hospital that was opened on 1st January 1894. Present at the opening ceremony were the local Chief Rabbi, the Governor, the Muslim Mufti, the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox priests, the local Chief Judge and many others from the local communities. The song a hymn in Arabic and a prayer was said. The governor and Mrs. Torrance performed the opening ceremony. initially, the hospital offered general care, and later became a maternity Hospital. in 1959, with the opening of a new state-run hospital it was no longer needed. it was closed down and re-opened two years later as a hospice for pilgrims, which later developed into a guest house. The policy of welcoming everybody regardless of race, creed or color initiated by Torrance is still in force. Local people have stayed and eaten breakfast in the room in which they first sow the light of day when it was the delivery room. in the summer, Torrance would travel amongst the nomadic peoples and in the cooler months they would travel to Tiberias. On one occasion, a huge Bedouin warrior was seen crawling on his hands and knees up the stairs to the wards because he had never seen a two-story buildings before The port of the upstairs lounge area was once an operating theatre with huge windows providing good light. The Ceilidh Bar and other rooms either side of it at the head of the stairs were the wards, female on the left, male on the right, Muslim in the middle. There were eight beds in each ward and six cots distributed as required. Torrance held weekly services in Arabic and English. They were received sometimes with silence, sometimes with abuse and sometimes with response and debate. Torrance believed however, that real communication of the Gospel came in the unconditional acceptance of the sick. From the roof terrace, one can see the mixed nature of old Tiberias with the Great Mosque, St.Peter's Roman Catholic Church and several Synagogues. The modern high-rise hotels show that Tiberias has become a town built on tourism. Rev. Andrew Bonar who was in the original exploratory team of 1839 predicted, "Tiberias will one day become one of the most important winter resorts in the world". Tiberias now has over 6000 hotel beds with more being added. The Scots Hotel contributes 140 beds to the total, and through the ethos of the place provides Christian hospitality to all people regardless of race. The old church building is a place of worship that has been the central focus of the spiritual life of the mission since about 1930. The building was originally a school, but was turned into a church sanctuary in the 1890s. The church is named after St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland. David Torrance was a doctor who moved to Tiberias to help the people there. He was very successful and helped a lot of people, even though it was difficult. He had a lot of children, some of whom became doctors too. David Torrance was a missionary who served in the Tiberias Mission. He was ordained a missionary minister by Glasgow Presbytery in 1895. His main tasks were in educational work, both formal and religious. John Soutar was also a missionary who served in the Tiberias Mission. He is buried in the same graveyard as David Torrance. The Beach Tower is part of the old city wall that was first laid on this site by the Crusaders. Donna Gracia, a Portuguese Jew, rebuilt the walls with the help of her nephew. In the 18th century, the Bedouin leader Daher Al Omar rebuilt the walls again. Part of the original Roman city wall can still be seen over by the hot springs. By the time Dr. Torrance arrived, the city was squashed into the 34 acres that the Crusaders had walled in after the earthquake of 1034. The city was under Turkish control and administered by a local Arab Governor. Because of this structure, the locals thought that Torrance would never be allowed to own land or build a hospital. The Turkish authorities were suspicious of anything that missionaries did. Torrance obtained all the land he wanted by means of regular conversations with the owner who was a Mufti, a local Muslim leader. Torrance never expressed an interest in the land but was finally offered it for 60 British Pounds. He immediately built two residences, one for the minister in 1891 and one for himself a year later. For a hospital building, a special deed of permission (a firman) was needed. The book is about a doctor named Torrance who goes to Constantinople to help people. He is able to do this because he is a very determined person and because he has the support of the local officials. He is seen as a very compassionate person and is one of the first healers to work in that area in a long time. He attributes his skills to his faith in Christ. The Manse is a house that was built in 1890. It is a big house with many rooms. It became a hospital for women and children in 1921. A Turkish man bought the land for the hospital, but he decided it was too hot in Tiberias so he sold it cheaply to Torrance. The Present It is unthinkable that any church would voluntarily abandon work on the shore of the Lake that saw so much of Jesus' ministry. The potential for the site to be used for the furtherance of the Kingdom is so huge that the response needed to be one of great vision. in 1999 the General Assembly of the church of Scotland overwhelmingly caught the vision. We are now at the beginning of fulfilling that vision. By erecting a new building and refurbishing and upgrading the existing ones, we are now in a position to offer Christian hospitality to all - pilgrims from overseas and groups and individuals from Israel who seek rest and opportunity for reflection in conditions of unsurpassed comfort and service. The gardens have been landscaped and replanted with a variety of flowers and trees. The views from almost everywhere on the premises are wonderful, whether they be of the Lake and the Golan Heights beyond (on clear winter days even snow covered Mount Hermon looking like a long low cloud is visible) or of Bereniki and the Swiss Forest above the town. Situated as it is, on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, the Scots Hotel is ideally positioned for exploration of the north of Israel whether it be holy sites associated with the birth of Christianity, ancient sites that speak of the history of this land and region or the wonders of creation in the spring flowers and migrating birds. The Church of Scotland is a branch of Christianity that started in Scotland. It is also known as "The Kirk" and people in it are called Presbyterians. The Church of Scotland believe in democracy and that everyone is equal in the eyes of God.

Tzemach beach Sea of Galilee

The renewed Tzemach beach Sea of Galilee At the Tzemach junction in front of a mall in front of the Sea of Galilee You will find the Tzemach beach Sea of Galilee - a quiet beach with wide lawns, shades and toilets. Admission to the beach is free and is open for your enjoyment all days of the week. Fun bathing and a pleasant pastime. Tzemach beach is a quiet beaches, where music alcohol are forbidden. Inspectors will work with the assistance of the Kinneret Environmental Guard Unit and the teams on the beaches, to enforce and maintain public order. This is in addition to the security guards.

Tiberias – A tour in a holy cities

Tiberias is a large city in the north of Israel, situated on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee (the Kinneret). The rich history of Tiberias, alongside its excellent weather and great views, make it one of the most popular resorts in Israel and one of the main tourist attractions. Tiberias has been one of the most significant places in Israel for the Jewish community for centuries: Together with Jerusalem, Hebron and Safed, it is one of the holiest cities in the country. It was the home of the great Jewish council (the Sanhedrin) and many claim it is where the Jerusalem Talmud (“Talmud Yerushalmi") was written. Today it is still mostly populated with different religious Jewish communities. Tiberias has been the heart of the Galilee for many years. In the days of Tiberius Caesar - whom the city is named after - the Jewish community was banned from living in Safed and moved to Tiberias. In the roman days, many Jewish scholars and rabbis lived and studied there, and were later buried in and around the city. Since those days, many visitors come to pay their respect and pray in some of these Tzadikim Graves (graves of the pious). Most famous of which are the tomb of Rambam (in the city center) which was one of the greatest minds in Jewish history; the tomb of Rabbi Meir Baal Haness, where a special festival is held every second Passover (next to the southern part of Tiberias' sea of Galilee coast); and the tomb of Rabbi Akiva (at the western entrance to Tiberias) which is visited traditionally by believers at the evening of Yom Kippur. The Tiberias ancient synagogue is another site to visit if you wish to explore the Jewish community's daily routine in the old days. The ancient synagogue (on the southern exit of the city) served the Jewish population during the third and fourth centuries, and has a beautiful mosaic floor with the images of the 12 signs. Another nice stop is the Tiberias Archeological site (at the heart of the city), which shows the remnants of an ancient synagogue that used to be active during the sixth century, as well as a Jewish living quarter.

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Galilee

The Gilboa Nature Reserve

Located above Emek Harod and Beit Shean valleys, Gilboa Nature Reserve is situated on the slopes of a mountain. Visitors come to the Gilboa to admire the Gilboa Iris and its abundant blossoms in the spring, to walk along its beautiful hiking trails, and to admire its picturesque views. Gilboa's Olive Hotel is located on top of the Gilboa and offers views of the three valleys: Valley of the Springs, Harod Valley, and Jezreel Valley. Tel Kolila means total beauty in Arabic, the Arabic name of Mount Shaul. In fact, the mountain that stands out from the steep escarpment of the Gilboa provides a spectacular view of the surroundings. The top of the mountain has a short footpath that provides additional views of the surrounding area. About 160 meters above the valley is Givat Jonathan, named after Jonathan ben Shaul. The name Horvat Karmat comes from the Arabic name Tel al-Karam. There is a wave of stones on top of the hill in memory of the seven sons of the valley who died during the War of Independence. From prehistoric times until the Byzantine period, human settlements can be found in the area. As mentioned in the Gideon chapter, Ein Harod was north of Givat HaMorah in the valley, and the Midian camp was to the north of it (Judges 7:1, 5). Ein Jelud, at the foot of Givat Yehonan, is the Arabic name for Ma'ayan Harod, and it may preserve the sound of the original name Gilad. The remains of the small Arab village of Khirbat Umm Sarkhan, as well as Roman and Byzantine buildings, quarries, and cisterns, can be found in Horvat Ner. At the end of Horvat Ner's extension, the view is spectacular - Emek Harod, the eastern Galilee mountains, Beit Shean, the Jordan Valley, and the Wall of Gilead. Gilboa's highest peak is Mount Barkan. In the vicinity of the mountain, Gilboa Irises are in bloom. The trail descends from Mount Barkan to Emek Haneem and Tel Yosef. There are still communication channels from the War of Independence in the mountain area. In the Vanishing Valley, there is a tiny spring called Ein Hamel. Near the spring, a trough was built during the British mandate. During the British Mandate, Sergeant Moshe Rosenfeld was the commanding officer of the Shata Police Station (now a prison). Rosenfeld followed fruit thieves who belonged to the gang of Ezz a-Din Kasem and they murdered him near the spring. From the intersection of Nof Gilboa Road (Route 667) and Beit Alfa Road (Route 6666), Nahal Yitzpoor descends steeply for a short distance. A beautiful flower blooms in the stream in the spring. We regret to inform you that the extension that was used for parking near the road has been closed.

Bashert Restaurant Safed

The food at Bashert Restaurant is some of the most innovative and magical that I have ever tasted. The chef's menu combines advanced cooking methods with a twist of fine cuts of meat from the smokehouse, and the result is a variety of dishes that are simply incredible. The chicken soup with dumpling is Jewish gnocchi with shredded meat, blinches with smoked liver, and the title gem, juicy slow-smoked asado from the smokehouse and Bashert's 8-hour smoked brisket, are all must-tries. The restaurant is strictly kosher, and kosher by the Orthodox Jewish community. If you're ever in Safed, don't miss out on this dining experience of a lifetime. Address Jerusalem 35 Safed, Israel 073-231-1331

Sea of Galilee Boat Ancient fishing boat from the 1st century AD

On the north-west shore of the Sea of Galilee in Israel, an ancient fishing boat known as the Ancient Galilee Boat, also known as the Jesus Boat, was found in 1986. The remains of the boat, 27 feet (8.27 meters) long, 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) wide and 4.3 feet (1.3 meters) high, first appeared during a drought, when the waters of the Sea receded (actually a great fresh-water lake). The boat has no other connection to Jesus or his disciples besides the dating. Exploration and discovery Fishing brothers Moshe and Yuval Lufan found the ancient Galilee Boat's remains in Kibbutz Ginnosar. In their quest to discover artifacts from the past of Israel, the brothers were avid amateur archaeologists. Their family had fished in the Sea of Galilee for generations, and they had always hoped to find a boat there one day. They discovered the remains of the boat being buried on the shore when the lake's water level was reduced by drought. It represents the type of boat that Jews' ancestors used for fishing and transportation across Lake Galilee in the 1st century. Before now, only Roman authors, the Bible, and mosaics had provided archaeologists with insight into the construction of these types of vessels. Christians also value the boat because it was the type of boat that Jesus and his disciples used, many of whom were fishermen. Though the Sea of Galilee Boat itself does not seem to be directly linked to Jesus or his disciples, boats of this type played a major role in Jesus' life and ministry, and are mentioned 50 times in the Gospels. Lednica lake in Poland has a replica of the Jesus Boat, built in Prudnik by boatbuilders from Pomerania and Franciscan Dr. Antoni Dudek.

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